Over Head Panel Touch Screens (OHPTS)

Gulfstream GVII

Eddie sez:

The three touch screens on the overhead panel take the place of all those switches and dials you grew up with, only better. Once you start to remember what page to look at to find what you need, they become fairly intuitive.

You can think of the three Over Head Panel Touch Screens (OHPTSs) as three views of eight different pages of a cockpit over head panel. You can only see three of the pages at a time, but you can place any of the eight possible choices on any of the three screens. You will find some of the manuals refer to parts of these pages as "islands."

Everything here is from the references shown below, with a few comments in an alternate color.

How it is usually done . . .

Consider the humble fuel panel in a Gulfstream G550. It has a few jobs that involve a bunch of switches: turn pumps on or off, turn valves open or closed, turn the Heated Fuel Return System on or off. We've been doing it basically this way since the GII.

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Photo: G550 fuel panel
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So what's wrong with what has worked since the 1960s? Plenty. That fuel panel is taking up valuable cockpit real estate. The switches don't have a backup, if one breaks, you may or may not be able to continue. And those switches will eventually break because of the many times they have to be pressed. Okay, you probably thought of those reasons. Well here is another: it takes a human being to press those buttons. Even if the only option is to press a switch, the airplane cannot do it for you.

How it is done in the GVII . . .

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Photo: G500 fuel page displayed on an OHPTS, PAS, p. 3-14
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The fuel panel is just one page of eight on one, two, or three OHPTS screens. It has the same switches as the G550 fuel panel but contains more information. There are no physical parts to wear out and if the screen goes bad, you have two others. Those fuel pumps can be turned on or off by the APU or the engines. If you have an amber CAS message pointing to this page, the "FUEL" button on bottom with be shown in amber to help guide you to this page.

Last revision:

2020-03-21

Color Conventions

Green (such as the IRS/APU/Batt button shown) indicates a normal condition.

White (such as the ECS button shown) indicates the button is not selected, informational text, or label.

Gray (not depicted) means a selection that is not available.

Cyan (such as the IRS 1 On Batt button shown) indicates an operating condition that triggers a cyan CAS message.

Blooming (such as the cyan Fire Test shown) indicates the user has contacted a touch area.

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Photo: Color conventions, PAS, p. 2-14
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Amber (such as the L Alt Pump button shown) indicates an operating state that triggers an amber CAS message, a condition without a CAS message meaning pilot action required, or something that is not armed but selected on. A halo around a menu button means a failure that would trigger an amber CAS message associated with that page.

Red (such as the ECS button shown) indicates an operating state that triggers a Red CAS message associated with that page.

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Photo: Color conventions, PAS, p. 2-15
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OHPTS Initial Power Up and Beyond

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Photo: OHTPS initial power-up screens, battery power only.
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When you first bring up the airplane, OHTPS 2 will be on IRS APU BATT page and OHPTS 3 will be on the Hydraulics / CPCS page. As it turns out, those are probably the starting pages you will be wanting because your first several tasks will be to check battery voltages, check the TROV open, pressurize the Aux Pump when setting the parking brake, doing a fire test prior to starting the APU, and starting the APU. But then what?

We tend to run #1 in ECS, #2 in Exterior Lights, and #3 in Hydraulics / CPCS, but that might change one of these days. You might think it doesn't matter, but if you get into the habit of keeping certain pages up, it will be less hunting around and fewer key presses to get what you want. If you need another page, other than your standard three, select the page, do what you need to do, and put the page back. I think this works best.

OHPTS IRS APU BATT Page

The APU page will have a Fire Test Switch if the APU Master is off. It will also have messages for various conditions: "APU Ready" (ready to start), "APU Door" (APU door failed to open), "APU Fault" (start checks have failed), "Cowl Door Open" (right engine cowl door is open).

The batteries island will show you the status of the main ship's batteries, the EBHA, and the UPS. If the RAT is active, it will show you its status.

For more about this page, see: GVII Electrical System.

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Photo: IRS/APU/Batt Page, PAS, p. 2-11
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OHPTS ECS Page

OHPTS Exterior Lights Page

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Photo: Exterior Lights Page, PAS, p. 2-11
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OHPTS Fuel Page

For more about this page, see: GVII Fuel System.

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Photo: Fuel Page, PAS, p. 2-11
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OHPTS Hydraulics / CPCS Page

OHPTS Cockpit Lights Page

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Photo: Cockpit Lights Page, PAS, p. 2-12
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OHPTS Anti-Ice Page

OHPTS DU Control / Test Page

The FDR/CMC button places an event stamp on the FDR recording using the CMC time series recording.

The CVR Test button causes the CVR to test.

The Master Test button performs a test of the indicated items (annunciators, smoke detectors, passenger oxygen, and equipment overheat). Selecting "System Test" gives you an opportunity to test these individually, as well as test for the RAT, Fire, and both engine ignition lanes on both engines.

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Photo: DU Control / Test Page, PAS, p. 2-12
Click photo for a larger image


See Also:

Gulfstream GVII-G500 Airplane Flight Manual, Revision 4, August 29, 2019

Gulfstream GVII-G500 Production Aircraft Systems, Revision 3, July 15, 2019