Eddie sez:

Taxi procedures for the G500 is about the same as previous Gulfstreams, with the addition of additional nose wheel steering authority using the rudder pedals. The G500 allows the pilot to command up to 40° of nose wheel steering (left or right) using the rudder pedals, and 82° (left or right) using the tiller.

There is no doubt that the people who designed the airplane say "Most ground taxi operations can be accomplished using the rudder pedals alone, with the tiller reserved for precise control at slow speeds and/or turns greater than 90°." (From Ground and Flight Operations. I have heard from many that they continue to use the tiller for all taxi operations until on the runway.

Everything here is from the references shown below, with a few comments in an alternate color.

Last revision:

20190603

AFM Procedure

[AFM, §02-04-10]

  1. POF . . . TAXI / DU PRESET

  2. NOTE

    3D AMM is a tool to provide additional situational awareness during ground operations and should not be used as the sole reference of the airport environment during taxi.

  3. PARKING BRAKE . . . Off

  4. XPDR . . . ON

  5. EXTERIOR LIGHTS . . . As required

  6. CAUTION

    ABRUPT OR LARGE TILLER INPUTS AT GROUNDSPEEDS ABOVE 25 KNOTS SHOULD BE AVOIDED TO PREVENT OVERCONTROL. PEDAL STEERING IS THE RECOMMENDED MEANS FOR DIRECTIONAL CONTROL UNLESS CONDITIONS REQUIRE A SMALLER TURN RADIUS THAN THE PEDALS PROVIDE.

  7. Brakes / NWS . . . Check

  8. CAUTION

    CONSIDER LIMITING T/R USE IF TAXI SURFACE IS DEGRADED OR CONTAMINATED TO PREVENT AIRCRAFT DAMAGE.

  9. Thrust Reversers (1ST flight) . . . Check

  10. NOTE

    If a comparison of the pitch trim indications on DU3 and the Standby Flight Displays indicates a miscompare greater than 0.2, notify maintenance and do not dispatch.

  11. Trim (3) . . . Set for takeoff

  12. FLAPS . . . Set for takeoff

  13. CPCS Pressure Profile . . . Flight

  14. CAUTION

    WING ANTI-ICE SHALL BE SELECTED ON AT LEAST 4 MINUTES PRIOR TO SETTING TAKEOFF POWER TO ENSURE RATED THRUST IS AVAILABLE DURING TKAEOFF. NORMAL WAI SYSTEM OPERATION MUST BE VERIFIED PRIOR TO TAKEOFF.

    NOTE

    During WAI operations, temperatures as high as 150°F may be observed prior to the system establishing a steady wing temperature. The WAI system maintains 130°F ±10°F during steady state operations.

  15. CAI / WAI . . . As required

  16. AUTOBRAKE . . . As required

  17. RADAR Mode . . . WX

  18. Guidance Panel . . . Set / Check

  19. Glareshield Visors . . . As required

  20. Flight Observer Seat Position / Interior Doors . . . Check

  21. POF . . . TAKEOFF / DU PRESET

  22. Takeoff Briefing . . . Update / Perform

  23. PFD / SFD . . . Set for departure / Displayed

  24. VSPEEDS . . . Check

  25. The obvious: make sure V2 is posted on the guidance panel. The hidden secret: make note of VSE. If you lose an engine you will need to know what VSE is after you retract the flaps, and those numbers will disappear at 1,500' AGL.

  26. Flight Controls (Copilot Sidestick) . . . Check

  27. APU BLEED AIR . . . OFF

Technique

These are snippets from Ground and Flight Operations

  • To initiate movement for taxi, release the brakes and smoothly advance the throttles the minimum amount to let the aircraft roll forward. Because of the residual thrust created at idle power, very little throttle movement is needed to move the aircraft. When adding power, wait for the aircraft to respond before adding additional power. As the engines spool up, the aircraft will begin moving smoothly at a comfortable speed. If obstructions are behind the aircraft, use the minimum thrust necessary for taxi to avoid damage caused by engine exhaust. Both engines should be used together to reduce the amount of thrust required from any one engine.
  • Do not ride the brakes. Overheated brakes reduce braking efficiency and could seriously affect the stopping distance during a rejected takeoff. Use of idle reverse is permissible on clean taxiways to reduce brake usage. A single, idle, thrust reverser can be used anytime to effectively control taxi speeds. This action will require slight opposite pedal input to compensate for asymmetric thrust. Simultaneous use of both thrust reversers on the ground are limited to taxi speeds greater than 10 knots ground speed. Ground speed is displayed on the ground on both the PFD (when it is in Exocentric mode, the normal mode on the ground during taxi operations) and on the 2-D Airport Moving Map (AMM) display.
  • I think the reverser technique is from the days when older style brakes were prone to overheat. My experience with carbon-carbon brakes is you have to work to get the up to optimal temperature before takeoff and brake wear after landing and during taxi is inconsequential. More about this: Carbon-carbon brakes.

    images

    Photo: G500 Turning radius with maximum pedal deflection, Ground and Flight Operations, Figure 3.
    Click photo for a larger image

    The airplane was designed by former fighter pilots who looked down their long noses at the tiller and vowed to create an airplane that didn't need one, so they put the tiller uncomfortably aft out of what they thought was a normal pilot's reach. But they didn't realize that non-fighter pilots are usually tall and good looking, so we found that tiller and chose to use it. But keep in mind the pedal steering does work well if you aren't in tight spaces and don't need to square your turns.

    It is easy to overcontrol the nosewheel when using the pedals. We have a tendency to look right over the nose to ensure we are tracking straight. But try to look further down the taxiway instead. I find it easier to be gentle on the nosegear using this technique.


Gulfstream GVII-G500 Airplane Flight Manual, Revision 4, August 29, 2019

Gulfstream GVII-G500 Ground and Flight Operations, released as part of the GVII-G500 AOM, §02-01-10