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Safety Assessment of Foreign Aircraft (SAFA)

International Operations Appendices

The idea here is to beat the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) at their own game and to sail through their ramp checks, known as Safety Assessment of Foreign Aircraft (SAFA), as quickly and painlessly as possible. You can do that if you know what they are looking for and have it ready for them in a binder organized exactly the same as their inspection checklist. It has been my experience that as soon as they see that, they will walk away dispirited, crushed former shells of themselves. Just how I like it.

If you would like an editable copy of this expanded checklist:


 

SAFA Checks for 14 CFR 91 Operators

One of Eddie's readers got this straight from the source:

Hello.

I am the Safety Manager for a US based Part 91 corporate flight department. I have been tasked with assisting in the development of a SAFA checklist for our Gulfstream V aircraft. I have reviewed the SAFA Ramp Inspections Guidance material, V 2.0, as well as INSPECTION INSTRUCTIONS ON THE CATEGORISATION OF RAMP INSPECTION (SAFA/SACA) FINDINGS and it appears to me that all the standards reference ICAO Annex 6, Vol 1 which is for commercial operators. Vol. 2 is for General Aviation but I do not see any references to that document. Is there a separate inspection checklist for non-commercial operators like us? There is a difference between the two Volumes as to how one would comply with the requirements of the SAFA. Any assistance in this matter would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

David _____

Dear Mr _____,

The SAFA Ramp inspection program is primarily developed for Commercial Air Transport and Aircrafts weighing more than 5700kgs and our instructions reflect those type of operations.

It’s correct that the instructions for Ramp inspections only refers to Annex 6 Part I and below you will find exactly what is used for references. Part II is General Aviation which is defined as “other than commercial air transport operation or aerial work” and in most cases below 5700kgs and it has not been a priority to develop Part II or even Part III. It’s on our wish list to develop predefined findings also for Part II/III and we might also do this in the future if our participating states desire this or the need increases.

Our instructions is created as a tool to support inspectors during the inspections and not a set of requirements which of course can vary between the States and you should contact your oversight Authority, if you have questions regarding requirements in Part II for your type of operation since SAFA isn’t a separate set of requirements.

From: EASA SAFA Coordination (safa@easa.europa.eu)

The inspector then went on to detail the same list of references I have listed below. So the bottom line is that "other than commercial air transport" operations have not been a priority but are subject to SAFA checks. They might develop specific guidance "in the future." I think it is sound practice to prepare for the SAFA check even if you are not a commercial operator. They are legally allowed to check you and you might as well be prepared.

Recent Findings

A good place to check for recent SAFA findings is the Flight Service Bureau. Here are the top three findings from recent European ramp checks.

  • Minimum Equipment Lists — Yes, you can get away with an MMEL in the United States. But that isn't true under ICAO rules and if the host nation doesn't have the same exception as found in the U.S., you could be in violation.
  • Flight Plan Errors
    • Flight Plan PBN Codes — The performance based navigation codes must reflect what you and your aircraft actually are capable of. If you are not trained for CPDLC, for example, you can't file the code.
    • Alternates — If your flight plan lists an alternate, you must have the correct fuel planned to get there. Some flight planning services only load enough fuel to fly directly, and chances are that isn't going to happen. Also, some operators have filed alternate airports that were closed at the time they would be needed.
  • Out of date AFM on the aircraft — The inspector checks a lot of aircraft and probaby has seen one just like yours very recently. Chances are he or she will know what is current so you should too.

Background

Members

In 1994 members of the European Civil Aviation Conference (ECAC) decided ICAO standards were not being applied by all and that something had to be done about it. In 1996 they adopted the SAFA program which included ramp checks on a voluntary basis until 2006 and mandatory thereafter. These checks would be administered by "safety third country aircraft using community airports," in other words, an N-number aircraft could only be ramp checked outside the U.S. and by inspectors other than the country being visited.

The SAFA Directive, 2004/36/CE, applies to all aircraft involved in "commercial operation" as well as aircraft over 5,700 KGS (12,500 lbs) in "non-commercial" operations — that means you.

You are liable for a SAFA check at any of the following countries:

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References

SAFA checks are made with reference to the following ICAO Annexes:

The Inspection

[SAFA Ramp Inspections Guidance Material, ¶3.1]

  1. The SAFA Ramp Inspection should preferably be performed by at least 2 inspectors. The main elements of the inspection, the visual inspection of the aircraft exterior, the inspection on the flight deck and the inspection of the passenger cabin and/or cargo compartments can be divided among the inspectors.
  2. Inspectors are entitled to perform a SAFA inspection and search the aircraft according to Article 16 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (search of aircraft): “...the appropriate authorities of each of the contracting States shall have the right...to search aircraft of other contracting States...”.
  3. Should an operator refuse to permit the performance of a SAFA inspection without a valid reason, the competent authority should consider the detention of the aircraft (provided that the national legislative framework allows for this). In such a case, the competent authority must immediately inform the State of oversight.
  1. Departure delay of an aircraft should be avoided. However, when an inspector discovers an issue which may have a major effect on flight safety or requires further investigation to be clarified, a delay may be justified, for example:
    1. the tyres appear to be worn beyond the limits (central groove no longer visible), however reference must be made to the applicable AMM to determine the actual limit;
    2. an oil leakage (e.g. 5 drops/minute) must be checked against the applicable AMM to determine the actual limit;
    3. a flight crew member cannot produce his/her licence. Clarification must be sought from the operator to confirm that the flight crew member has a valid licence by requesting, for instance, a copy of the licence to be sent to the inspectors for verification.

[SAFA Ramp Inspections Guidance Material, ¶3.3] Depending on the items to be inspected, a SAFA Ramp Inspection may be performed on landing or on departure of the aircraft. Fuel remaining and cargo area (overloading, restraining, segregation, etc.), are examples of items that could be checked on landing. Flight preparation and storage of baggage in the cabin could be checked on departure. However, inspectors should be aware of the following constraints; an inspection after landing should not jeopardise the total resting time of the flight crew and an inspection prior to departure should not lead to a departure delay unless there is a good reason.

Post-Inspection Actions

The ramp inspector can pat you on the back or cite you as in violation of an ICAO standard with minor, significant, or major action:

Class 1

[SAFA Ramp Inspections Guidance Material, ¶6.1.1] Class 1 action: information to the captain. A class 1 action is to be taken after each inspection, and consists of providing information about the results of that SAFA inspection, regardless of whether findings have been identified or not. In accordance with article 6.3 of the before mentioned Annex, this is achieved by a verbal debriefing and the delivery of the Proof of Inspection (POI) to the aircraft commander (or, in his/her absence, to another member of the flight crew or the most senior representative of the operator).

The inspection ends with the inspector telling you what he thinks.

Class 2

[SAFA Ramp Inspections Guidance Material, ¶6.1.2] Class 2 action: Information to the authority and the operator. Category 2 and 3 findings are considered to have a significant and major influence on safety. Therefore, when category 2 and/or 3 findings have been raised, written communications must be made in accordance – with Article 6.4 of the above mentioned Annex – to both:

  • The operator: The communication should request that corrective actions are taken (or alternatively the provision of a corrective action plan) and evidence supporting the corrective actions taken; in case of no focal point is known for the inspected operator, its Quality department might be the most suitable point of contact.
  • The state of oversight: The communication shall contain, where appropriate, a request for confirmation that they are satisfied with the corrective actions taken by the operator.

The inspector tells you to fix something and sends a letter to your base and the FAA (or equivalent).

Class 3

[SAFA Ramp Inspections Guidance Material, ¶6.1.3] Class 3 actions: Restrictions or corrective actions.

  • A class 3 action follows a category 3 finding which are considered to have a potential major effect on the safe operation of the aircraft. For that reason, Article 6.5 of the said Annex requires that action(s) need to be taken before the departure of the aircraft. On the ramp inspection report only the actions required/imposed by the inspector should be mentioned.
  • If the operator voluntary corrected a cat. 1 or 2 finding before the flight, this should not be reported as a class 3b action. Instead, such voluntary action should be mentioned in the "Additional information box".
  • If the category 3 (major) findings that have been established during the SAFA Ramp Check concern damage of a nature such that the aircraft is no longer airworthy, this has to be communicated immediately to the State responsible for overseeing the airworthiness of the aircraft. Although the first contact may be, as a matter of urgency, accomplished by telephone, it is advisable to use written communication procedures. For ICAO guidance on this matter, refer to ICAO Annex 8 Part II Chapter 3.5 – Temporary Loss of Airworthiness.
  • The class 3 action is divided into 4 sub-actions:
    • Class 3a. Restriction on the aircraft flight operation. The inspector(s) performing the ramp inspection have concluded that, as a result of some deficiencies identified during the inspection, the aircraft may depart only under certain restrictions.
    • Class 3b. Corrective actions before flight. The ramp inspector(s) have identified some deficiencies that require corrective action(s) before the intended flight.
    • Class 3c. Aircraft detained by inspecting National Aviation Authority. An aircraft is grounded in a situation where the category 3 (major) findings are not corrected by the operator before flight. Because the safety of the aircraft and its occupants is at stake, the aircraft has to be prevented from resuming its flight and has to be 'grounded' until the safety hazard is removed. This class of action should be imposed only if the crew refused to take the necessary corrective actions or to respect the restrictions on the aircraft flight operation. A class 3c action would also be appropriate when an operator refuses to permit the performance of a SAFA inspection without a valid reason (see paragraph 3.1 c), provided that the Inspecting NAA has set forth provisions in its national regulation covering this case.
    • Class 3d. Immediate operating ban. In case of an immediate and obvious safety hazard a competent authority may react by imposing an operating ban on an operator or an aircraft.

The Inspection Checklist

There are various versions of this floating around, the most popular of which is dated 2004.

The most current version is this one: SAFA Ramp Inspection Report, Official Journal of the European Union, 30.4.2004.

It seems pretty benign, but each of the items are ambiguous, to say the least. Starting with the first line, what are they looking for when they say "General Condition" of the flight deck? And we've all heard the horror stories of looking over pilot licenses and medicals, but the only item on the checklist is "Flight Crew License." Seems they are looking for more than the checklist leads you to believe.

If you look through some of their inspection reports over the years, you will find that to be true.

The 2012 EASA SAFA Guidance Material document is meant for the inspectors, but we can use it to prepare a SAFA Inspection Binder.

SAFA Inspection Binder

We have two binders, one with our aircraft documents and another set up just for a SAFA check. The SAFA binder has 54 tabs, each marked with the label from the EASA SAFA Inspection Guidance. In each tab is chapter and verse of what they are looking for. In some cases, like our LOAs, the actual document is in the binder. In other cases, the tab points to where the inspector can find the item. Do you have to go through all this trouble? No, but it will make your life easier the day an inspector shows up on the ramp. It works well for an FAA inspector too.

The language in the SAFA binder comes straight out of the EASA SAFA Guidance, to make it easier for the inspector. The references are given in the same code they use, which uses:

  • "A" to denote an ICAO Annex, such as [A6-I-4.3.1] to mean Annex 6, Part I, Chapter 4.3.1
  • "CC" to mean an article of the Chicago Convention, such as [CC29] to mean Article 29 of the Chicago Convention
  • "EUR" to mean the ICAO Doc 7030, such as [EUR 2.1.6.2] to mean ICAO Doc 7030, chapter 2.1.6.2

In some cases there is no reference given; it appears the inspector has wide latitude. As with many things when it involves an aviation inspector, there is much to be lost and little to be gained.

There are many things that do not appear in the inspector's guidance that have been the subject of many recent SAFA ramp inspections. EU Insurance documentation, for example, is a high interest item.

So, dear reader, what follows is a sterilized version of the binder in our airplane. You can print this out and each tab will print out on a separate page. Make the necessary changes to each tab and you are all set. If you make sure your browser header and footer functions are off, you should get a pretty clean copy. (If not, let Eddie know at the link below.) Put everything in a binder and make sure it is up-to-date prior to each trip outside the United States.

Aircraft Documentation — N__________

Original copies in this book, unless otherwise noted.

  1. Aircraft Australian Security Program Letter *Note 1
  2. Aircraft Certificate of Airworthiness (Copy; original in placard behind pilot's seat)
  3. Aircraft Certificates of Insurance
  4. Aircraft FAA Letters of Authorization
  5. Aircraft Lease Agreement
  6. Aircraft "No Single Failure" Exemption *Note 2
  7. Aircraft Noise Certificates
  8. Aircraft Radio License
  9. Aircraft Registration (Copy; original in placard behind pilot's seat)
  10. Aircraft RVSM Monitoring Proof
  11. Aircraft Safety Management System Certificates
  12. Aircraft US Customs Decal (Copy; original on tail of aircraft)
  13. Aircraft US Customs Overflight Exemption Letter
  14. Aircraft US Customs Visa Waiver Program Letter
  15. Pilot _________________ Documents
    1. Licenses (Copy)
    2. Medical Certificates (Copy)
    3. Passport (Copy)
    4. Radio Operator Permit (Copy)
    5. Training Certificates (Copy)
  16. Pilot _________________ Documents
    1. Licenses (Copy)
    2. Medical Certificates (Copy)
    3. Passport (Copy)
    4. Radio Operator Permit (Copy)
    5. Training Certificates (Copy)
  17. Pilot _________________ Documents
    1. Licenses (Copy)
    2. Medical Certificates (Copy)
    3. Passport (Copy)
    4. Radio Operator Permit (Copy)
    5. Training Certificates (Copy)

* Note 1. This is item one in our binder only because we had a need to apply for this and needed a place to keep it. If you don't need this letter your binder will not need to include it.

* Note 2. Some aircraft do not comply with the letter of every FAR paragraph and if a SAFA inspector knows about your particular aircraft’s weakness, having the exemption on hand can save you some trouble. You might ask your aircraft manufacturer and if they say you are good to go, you probably are. In the case of most Gulfstreams we do have one issue and the exemption letter has this to say about that:

By letter dated May 2, 2003, Richard J. Trusis, Director, Airworthiness/ Certification and Data Management, Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, P.O. Box 2206, Savannah, Georgia 31402- 2206, petitioned for a partial exemption from the “no single failure” criterion of § 25.901(c) of Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) as it relates to “uncontrollable high thrust failure conditions.” Recent studies and service experience indicate that some existing transport category airplanes do not strictly comply with § 25.901(c) for certain uncontrollable high thrust failure conditions. The proposed partial exemption, if granted, would permit similarly noncompliant Gulfstream Models G-1159, G-1159A, G-1159B, GIV, GV, and GV-SP derivative type design changes to be approved under Type Certificate Number A12EA after the date of the grant of partial exemption.

Gulfstream gave this to us as part of the certificate of airworthiness when we bought our G450 six years ago. The thing that is strange is we didn’t have this for our GIV or GV.

SAFA Inspection Preparation Checklist — N__________

Operator: ______________________________

The following checklist was prepared to follow the 2012 European Aviation Safety Agency Approvals & Standardisation Directorate SAFA Coordination Section "SAFA Ramp Inspections Guidance material Version 2.0" Each tab contains answers to the indicated SAFA Inspection Checklist inspection item in the form of: (1)The actual requested document, (2) Location of a requested document, (3) A photo, diagram, or description answering the inspection item, or (4) A narrative answer to the inspection item.

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The flight crew is eager to cooperate with the EASA SAFA inspection team and demonstrate full compliance with ICAO standards. If you cannot find what you are looking for, please ask! Thank you.



________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A01)

Tab A01 General Condition

  1. Stowage of interior equipment, suitcases, navigation chart cases, etc.
  2. We do not require navigation chart cases because most of our chart are electronic. The few charts and manuals that we do keep are secured in provided holders, bins, and cabinets. (See photos which follow)

  3. Means to monitor the door area from either pilot seat. [A6-I-13.2.3]
  4. (See photos which follow)

  5. Condition of flight deck windows.
  6. (See photos which follow)

  7. The number and composition of the flight crew shall not be less than that specified in the operations manual. [A6-I-9.1.1]
  8. G450 AFM 1-01-10 specifies a pilot and copilot is the minimum crew. (Extract follows)

  9. An operator shall formulate rules to limit flight time and flight duty periods. A6-I-2.2.10.2.
  10. Our Company Operations Manual specifies these limits. (Extract follows)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A01)

Charts and manuals storage:

Charts and manuals storage:

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Means to monitor the door area:

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Condition of flight deck windows:

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Minimum Flight Crew

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Flight Time and Duty Limits

Place your company manual extract here

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A02)

Tab A02 Emergency Exit

  1. Check whether access to emergency exits is restricted or impeded. [A8-IIIA-4.1.7.3]
  2. (See photos which follow)

  3. Prescribed safety and survival equipment that the crew or passengers are expected to use or operate at the time of an emergency shall be reliable, readily accessible and easily identified, and its method of operation shall be plainly marked. [A8-IIIA-8.3]
  4. (See photos which follow)

  5. Facilities shall be provided for the rapid evacuation of the aeroplane in conditions likely to occur following an emergency landing. Such facilities shall be related to the passenger and crew capacity of the aeroplane and shall be shown to be suitable for their intended purpose. [A8-IIIB-4.6.2]
  6. Four emergency escape exits, and alternate routes are shown in the Aircraft Flight Manual 4-19-30. (See extract which follow)

Unimpeded access to emergency exits

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Safety and Survival Equipment Access

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Emergency Escape Routes (Gulfstream G450 Airplane Flight Manual, §4-19-30)

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A03)

Tab A03 Equipment

  1. TAWS (E-GPWS): Check if installed and serviceable. If unserviceable check if properly deferred and check if still within MEL dispatch limits. Verify that the installed GPWS has a forward looking terrain avoidance function. If the terrain database is found to be expired, verify against the MEL the dispatch conditions. When an operational test can be performed by the pilot, it should be requested. [A6-I-6.15.8]
  2. The test procedure is in the Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2B-20-140 §3. (See test procedure, which follows)

  3. ACAS II (TCAS): Check if installed and serviceable. If unserviceable check if properly deferred (reported in the ATLB) and check if still within MEL dispatch limits. When an operational test can be performed by the pilot, it should be requested. [A6-I-6.18.2] (See test procedure, which follows)
  4. The test procedure is in the Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2A-34-60 §3.C. (See test procedure, which follows)

    SAFA inspectors have been asking recently for proof that TCAS 7.1 is installed. This is not easy to do from most cockpits; in our G450 there is no evidence from the avionics. Our only option is to carry the Aircraft Service Change and proof that we have the ASC installed.

    If you happen to be flying a G450, here it is: ASC 077, TCAS 7.1 Installation. For more about this: SAFA and TCAS 7.1.

    This service change activates the Controller Pilot Data Link Communication (CPDLC) functionality.

  5. RVSM. [A6-I-7.2.1] (LOA in Aircraft Documents Book, Tab 7)
  6. B-RNAV. [A6-I-7.2.1] (LOA in Aircraft Documents Book, Tab 7)
  7. P-RNAV. [A6-I-7.2.1] (LOA in Aircraft Documents Book, Tab 7)
  8. MNPS. [A6-I-7.2.1] (LOA in Aircraft Documents Book, Tab 7)
  9. 8.33 kHz Spacing. [EUR 3.2.1]
  10. Three VHF radios with 8.33 kHz spacing are installed. (See operating manual extract which follows)

  11. A CVR capable of retaining the information recorded during at least the last two hours of its operation. [A6-I-6.3.2.1.4]
  12. A description of the CVR can be found in the Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2B-23-60. (See extract which follows)

EGPWS Test Procedure Page 1 [Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2B-20-140 §3.]

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EGPWS Test Procedure Page 2 [Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2B-20-140 §3.]

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EGPWS Test Procedure Page 3 [Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2B-20-140 §3.]

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TCAS Test Procedure [Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2A-34-00, Page 21]

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8.33 kHz capability [Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2B-11-60 §3.C.]

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CVR Description [Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2B-23-60]

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A04)

Tab A04 Manuals

  1. Check for presence of Aircraft Flight Manual. [A6-I-6.2.3ab]
  2. The AFM is in the manuals closet, aircraft right, just forward of the interior cabin door. (See photo at Tab A01 in this binder)

  3. Check for presence of Operations Manual. [A6-I-6.2.3ab]
  4. Electronically held in aircraft EFB. (See photo which follows)

  5. An operator shall formulate rules to limit flight time and flight duty periods and for the provision of adequate rest periods for all its crew members. [A6-I-2.2.10.2]
  6. (Our Company Operations Manual specifies these limits, extract follows.)

  7. An operator shall provide, for the use and guidance of operations personnel concerned, an operations manual in accordance with Appendix 2. [A6-I-4.2.3.1]
  8. Electronically held in aircraft EFB. (See photo which follows)

  9. The operator shall provide such information in the Operations Manual as will enable the flight crew to carry out its responsibilities with regard to the transport of dangerous goods and shall provide instructions as to the action to be taken in the event of emergencies arising involving dangerous goods. [A18-9.2]
  10. Electronically held in aircraft EFB. (See photo which follows)

Electronic Flight Bag Contents

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Place your company manual extract here

Company Operations Manual - Flight/Duty Rest Requirements

Place your company manual extract here

Company Dangerous Goods Policy

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A05)

Tab A05 Checklists

  1. Check if checklists are available and easily accessible. [A6-I-4.2.6]
  2. Checklists available electronically in aircraft avionics, electronically on 'EFB, and in a Quick Reaction Handbook in cockpit. (See photo of EFB contents at Tab A04)

  3. Check if the OPS Manual contains the required checklists. Compare the version in OPS Manual with the ones available to the crew. Check if their content is in compliance with the operating manual covering all flight phases, in normal and emergency operations. [A6-I-4.2.6]
  4. The operations manual is held electronically in the EFB and issued by Gulfstream, as are all other checklists on the aircraft. (See photo of EFB contents at Tab A04)

  5. Check if the checklists are identical for all members of the flight crew. [A6-I-4.2.6]
  6. There is only one copy of each checklist type in the cockpit.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A06)

Tab A06 Radio Navigation Charts

  1. Check if the required departure, en-route, approach and aerodrome charts are available, within reach, up-to-date to the latest AIRAC amendments, including those for the alternate aerodromes. [A6-I-6.2.3c]
  2. All departure, en route, approach, and aerodrome charts are held electronically in the aircraft avionics suite. The revision dates can be found on a display unit accessing the CMC function. (See photo which follows)

  3. Check the validity of the FMS/GPS database; in case of expiration, check the MEL. [A6-I-7.4.2]
  4. FMS/GPS database revision dates can be found on a display unit accessing the CMC function as well as any MCDU. (See photo which follows)

  5. An aeroplane shall carry: current and suitable charts to cover the route of the proposed flight and any route along which it is reasonable to expect that the flight may be diverted. [A6-I-6.2.3c]
  6. Route charts are held electronically in the aircraft avionics suite as well as paper route charts held in binders in the aircraft publication cabinet just aft of the cockpit throttle quadrant and in the publications cabinet on the aircraft right just forward of the interior cabin door. (See photo at Tab A01 of this binder)

Revision Dates on CMC

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Revision Dates on MCDU

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A07)

Tab A07 Minimum Equipment List

  1. Check if the MEL is available. [A6-I-6.1.3]
  2. MEL is held electronically in EFB. (See photo of EFB at Tab 04)

  3. Check if the MEL is not less restrictive than MMEL. [A6-I-6.1.3]
  4. MEL was written by and with approval of aircraft manufacturer and found to be compliant.

Is an MMEL good enough? Technically no. ICAO Annex 6, Part I, Chapter 6 (for commerical operators) and ICAO Annex 6, Part II, Chapter 3.6 (for general aviation) both require an MEL. While both make mention of what an MMEL is, the requirement is for an MEL. I've heard of operators being able to convince SAFA inspectors that the MMEL was approved in the U.S.. But if you can get yourself an MEL, you will save yourself some trouble.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A08)

Tab A08 Certificate of Registration

  1. Check Certificate of Registration Check for presence and accuracy. In the case where only a photocopy is on board a finding should be made against “No valid CofR or cannot be shown by crew”. Check if its format and content are in accordance with the requirements and whether translated into the English language. [A7-7.1]
  2. Original in holder behind pilot's seat, copies in Documents Binder Tab 12. (Copy follows in this tab)

  3. Check for fireproof identification plate (usually near the left forward door). Compare the data on the plate with that on the C of R. Note: Annex 7 requires that a fireproof plate needs to be installed near the main entrance. It is often found that the plate is located somewhere else on the aircraft. Although it is not compliant to the requirements, the safety relevance is rather low and therefore no finding should be raised. [A7-8]
  4. (See photo which follows)

To meet the "letter of the law," you can have an identification plate installed on your door as shown.

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Before the identification plate above was an option, most Gulfstream pilots pointed to the data plate on the tail and the inspector shrugged his or her shoulders and moved on. The proper identification plate was not an option until 2013.

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A09)

Tab A09 Noise certificate

  1. Noise Certificate: Check for presence, accuracy (e.g. cross check MTOM, S/N with the ones specified in the C of R) of the document attesting noise certification and whether translated in English language. [A16-I-II-1.4]
  2. The original noise certificates are in Aircraft Documents Binder Tab 10. (Copies follow in this tab)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A10)

Tab A10 AOC or equivalent

  1. An operator shall not engage in commercial air transport operations unless in possession of a valid air operator certificate issued by the State of the Operator. [A6-I-4.2.1.5/ A6-I-4.2.1.6/ A6-I-4.2.1.7]
  2. NOT APPLICABLE: We are not a commercial operator

  3. Commercial air transport operators shall carry a certified true copy of the air operator certificate specified and a copy of the operations specifications relevant to the aeroplane type, issued in conjunction with the certificate. [A6-I-4.2.1.6]
  4. NOT APPLICABLE: We are not a commercial operator

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A11)

Tab A11 Radio license

  1. Radio License: Check for presence and accuracy. Check for the correct name/call sign. Note: Following the Articles 29e and 30 of the Chicago Convention, a radio license is a license to install radio transmitting apparatus. ICAO does not specify the information to be mentioned on the Radio License. The requirement to have a radio license is originating from Article 18 of the Radio Regulations from the International Telecommunications Union, which requires the issuing State to include, besides the name/call sign, “the general characteristics of the installation” into the license. However, the exact content of such a license is only given by the ITU as a recommendation only (Recommendation 7 Rev. WRC-97). Therefore no finding should be raised on the content of the radio license, unless the mentioned information is incorrect. [CC-29e]
  2. Original is the Aircraft Documents Binder Tab 11. (Copy follows in this tab)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A12)

Tab A12 Certificate of Airworthiness

  1. Certificate of Airworthiness: Check for presence, accuracy and validity. [A8-II-3.3.1]
  2. Original in document holder behind pilot's seat, copies are in the Aircraft Documents Binder Tab 2. (Copy follows in this tab)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A13)

Tab A13 Flight Preparation

  1. An operational flight plan shall be completed for every intended flight. The operational flight plan shall be approved and signed by the pilot-in-command and, where applicable, signed by the flight operations officer/flight dispatcher, and a copy shall be filed with the operator or a designated agent, or, if these procedures are not possible, it shall be left with the aerodrome authority or on record in a suitable place at the point of departure. [A6-I-4.3.3.1]
  2. Our international flight plans are signed electronically with and held by Rockwell Collins (Air Routing), +1-713-430-7200.

  3. Check for proper filing system (retaining of all relevant flight preparation documents).
  4. Flight plans are retained for 6 months at the base of operations.

  5. Check for proper performance and fuel calculation.
  6. The aircraft performance computer makes all necessary calculations.

  7. Check the fuel consumption monitoring of the incoming flight (if required by the OPS manual).
  8. Fuel consumption is monitored and recorded on the master document.

  9. Check if the operator has selected appropriate alternate aerodromes (if required).
  10. Alternate aerodromes are declared on the flight plan.

  11. Check if the crew ensured that the weather forecast at the destination or the destination alternate aerodrome is above minima.
  12. Crews do check destination and alternate weather prior to departure.

  13. Check whether the flight crew has reviewed the applicable NOTAMS and/or pre-flight information bulletins (including those for alternate aerodromes).
  14. Flight planning services do include NOTAMS.

  15. Check for the presence and accuracy of the ATC flight plan, including proper equipment codes.
  16. Flight plans are checked for accuracy by Rockwell-Collins (Air Routing) and equipment codes are in accordance with aircraft equipment and qualification. (Equipment code listing follows.)

G450 Flight Plan Equipment Codes

Left of Slash

  • S VHF, VOR, ILS
  • B LPV
  • D DME
  • E2 D-FIS ACARS
  • E3 PDC ACARS
  • F ADF
  • G GNSS
  • H HF
  • I IRS
  • J3 CPDLC via FANS 1/A VDL Mode A
  • J5 CPDLC vis FANS 1/A SATCOM (INMARSAT)
  • M1 ATC SATCOM (INMARSAT)
  • R PBN (requires remark in block 18)
  • W RVSM
  • X MNPS
  • Y VHF with 8.33 spacing
  • Z Other Com, Nav, or Dat (requires remark in block 18)

Right of Slash:

  • S Mode S transponder with Flt ID, pressure altitude, enhanced surveillance
  • L Mode S transponder with Flt ID, pressure altitude, enhanced surveillance and ADS-B
  • B1 ADS-B out via 1090 MHz
  • D1 ADS-C via FANS 1/A

The minimum to get across the North Atlantic and into Europe is: SXWGHRY/S.

For A Gulfstream G450 with enhanced navigation (Certification F-Enhanced):

SBDE2E3FGHIJ3J5M1RWXYZ/SD1

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A14)

Tab A14 Weight and balance sheet

  1. A flight shall not be commenced until flight preparation forms have been completed certifying that the pilot-in-command is satisfied that: the mass of the aeroplane and centre of gravity location are such that the flight can be conducted safely, taking into account the flight conditions expected; and that any load carried is properly distributed and safely secured. [A6-I-4.3.1(d)(e)]
  2. Company procedures require the pilot-in-command sign the Flight and Maintenance Log prior to the flight once all preflight inspections have been satisfactorily completed and a maintenance release has been issued. Crews complete a weight and balance calculation prior to every flight and record the aircraft's actual weight, maximum allowable weight, center of gravity, and center of gravity limits. The calculations are made on the EFB with a program specific to that purpose and are recorded on the aircraft flight and maintenance log. (Example follows)

  3. The mass of the aeroplane at the start of take-off shall not exceed the maximum take-off mass specified in the flight manual for the pressure-altitude appropriate to the elevation of the aerodrome, and, if used as a parameter to determine the maximum take-off mass, any other local atmospheric condition. [A6-I-5.2.7]
  4. The maximum takeoff weight is computed in accordance with the Gulfstream G450 Airplane Flight Manual, §Section 5. (Available in aircraft manuals cabinet, aircraft right just forward of the cabin door.) The aircraft performance computer ensures these maximums are not exceeded.

  5. The mass of the aeroplane for the expected time of landing at the aerodrome of intended landing and at any destination alternate aerodrome shall not exceed the maximum landing mass specified in the flight manual for the pressure altitude appropriate to the elevation of those aerodromes, and if used as a parameter to determine the maximum landing mass, any other local atmospheric condition. [A6-I-5.2.7]
  6. The maximum landing weight is computed in accordance with the Gulfstream G450 Airplane Flight Manual, §Section 5. (Available in aircraft manuals cabinet, aircraft right just forward of the cabin door.) The aircraft performance computer ensures these maximums are not exceeded.

  7. In no case shall the mass at the start of take-off, or at the expected time of landing at the aerodrome of intended landing and at any destination alternate aerodrome, exceed the relevant maximum masses at which compliance has been demonstrated with the applicable noise certification Standards in Annex 16, Volume I, unless otherwise authorized in exceptional circumstances for a certain aerodrome or a runway where there is no noise disturbance problem, by the competent authority of the State in which the aerodrome is situated. [A6-I-5.2.7]
  8. Crews check departure, destination, and alternate aerodromes against the Gulfstream Noise Information Manual (available in the EFB) for proper noise abatement procedures.

Example weight and balance computation:

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A15)

Tab A15 Hand fire extinguishers

  1. An aeroplane shall be equipped with: portable fire extinguishers of a type which, when discharged, will not cause dangerous contamination of the air within the aeroplane. At least one shall be located in: the pilot's compartment; and each passenger compartment that is separate from the pilot's compartment and that is not readily accessible to the flight crew; Note.- Any portable fire extinguisher so fitted in accordance with the certificate of airworthiness of the aeroplane may count as one prescribed. [A6-I-6.2.2b]
  2. Fire extinguishers are positioned exactly as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness (See location chart which follows)

Emergency equipment location:

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A16)

Tab A16 Life jackets/flotation device

  1. When flying over water and at a distance of more than 93 km (50 NM) away from the shore, land planes shall carry life jackets/flotation devices for each person on board, stowed in a position easily accessible from the seat or berth of the person for whose use it is provided. [A6-I-6.5.2.1]
  2. Life jackets are positioned exactly as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness (See location chart which follows)

Life Vests Positions

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A17)

Tab A17 Harness

  1. An aeroplane shall be equipped with: A safety harness for each flight crew seat. The safety harness for each pilot seat shall incorporate a device, which will automatically restrain the occupant's torso in the event of rapid deceleration. [A6-I-6.2.2.c3]
    -- Each pilot seat has an appropriate harness exactly as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness. (Drawing follows)

Pilot Seat Harness

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A18)

Tab A18 Oxygen equipment

  1. All flight crew members of pressurized aeroplanes operating above an altitude where the atmospheric pressure is less than 376 hPa (25,000 feet) shall have available at the flight duty station a quick donning type of oxygen mask which will readily supply oxygen upon demand. [A6-I-4.4.5.2]
  2. The cockpit has three quick donning oxygen masks exactly as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness. (see illustration which follows)

  3. Prescribed safety and survival equipment that the crew or passengers are expected to use or operate at the time of an emergency shall be reliable, readily accessible and easily identified, and its method of operation shall be plainly marked. [A8-IIIA-8.3, A8-IIIB-6.3, A8-V-6.3]
  4. Oxygen masks are readily available, exactly as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness. (See operating manual extract which follows)

  5. A flight to be operated at flight altitudes at which the atmospheric pressure in personnel compartments will be less than 700 hPa (10,000 feet) shall not be commenced unless sufficient stored breathing oxygen is carried to supply: a) all crew members and 10 per cent of the passengers for any period in excess of 30 minutes that the pressure in compartments occupied by them will be between 700 hPa (10,000 feet) and 620 hPa (13,000 feet); and b) the crew and passengers for any period that the atmospheric pressure in compartments occupied by them will be less than 620 hPa. [A6-I-4.3.8.1]
  6. Crews normally plan to be able to continue any flight no higher than 10,000 in the event of a pressurization loss and ensure oxygen quantity is sufficient using the chart available in G450-OMS-01, Table III. (See extract, which follows)

Quick Donning Oxygen Masks

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Oxygen Required (G450-OMS-02)

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Passenger Oxygen System (Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2A-35-10, Page 1)

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Passenger Oxygen System (Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2A-35-10, Page 2)

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A19)

Tab A19 Flash light

  1. Check that appropriate electric torches are readily available at all crew member stations. Check their condition, serviceability and access. [EASA SAFA Inspector's Guide]
  2. Each pilot seat has an electric flashlight readily available, exactly as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness.. (See photo which follows)

  3. All aeroplanes, when operated at night shall be equipped with an electric torch for each crew member station. [A6-I-6.10f]
  4. Each pilot seat has an electric flashlight readily available, exactly as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness. (See photo which follows)

Pilot's Flashlights

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A20)

Tab A20 Flight crew license

  1. A person shall not act as a flight crew member of an aircraft unless a valid licence is held showing compliance with the specifications of this Annex and appropriate to the duties to be performed by that person. The licence shall have been issued by the State of Registry of that aircraft or by any other Contracting State and rendered valid by the State of Registry of that aircraft. Note.— Article 29 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation requires that the flight crew members carry their appropriate licences on board every aircraft engaged in international air navigation. [A1-1.2.1]
  2. Each flight crewmember holds the appropriate license on their possession and copies are kept in the Aircraft Documents Binder at Tabs 19 forward, Sub tab A.

  3. The flight crew shall include at least one member who holds a valid licence, issued or rendered valid by the State of Registry, authorizing operation of the type of radio transmitting equipment to be used. [A6-I-9.1.2]
  4. Each flight crewmember holds the appropriate radio operator permit on their possession and copies are kept in the Aircraft Documents Binder at Tabs 19 forward, Sub tab D.

  5. A Contracting State, having issued pilot licences, shall not permit the holders thereof to act as pilot-in command of an aircraft engaged in international commercial air transport operations if the licence holders have attained their 60th birthday or, in the case of operations with more than one pilot where the other pilot is younger than 60 years of age, their 65th birthday. [A1-2.1.10.1]
  6. Our operations require either (a) both pilots be younger than 60 years of age, or (b) one pilot to be younger than 60 if the other pilots is between 60 and 65.

  7. Pilots require a Medical Assessment valid from the date of the medical examination for a period not greater than: 60 months for the private pilot licence, 12 months for the commercial pilot licence, 12 months for the multi-crew pilot licence, 12 months for the airline transport pilot licence; except when the holders of airline transport pilot licences have passed their 40th birthday, the period of validity shall be reduced to six months. [A1-1.2.5.2 Except as provided in 1.2.5.2.1, 1.2.5.2.2, 1.2.5.2.3, 1.2.5.2.4, 1.2.5.2.5 and 1.2.5.2.6]
  8. Each flight crewmember holds the appropriate medical certificate on their possession and copies are kept in the Aircraft Documents Binder at Tabs 19 forward, Sub tab B.

  9. Check for spare correcting spectacles (in case a flight crew member is required to wear corrective lenses).
  10. Crews requiring corrective lenses carry spares.

  11. Check for endorsement of English language proficiency (ELP) in the license.
  12. All pilot's licenses have the ELP.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A21)

Tab A21 Journey log book

  1. The pilot-in-command shall be responsible for the journey log book or the general declaration containing the information listed in 11.4.1. [A6-I-4.5.5]
  2. [ICAO Annex 6, Part 1 §11.4]

    11.4.1 The aeroplane journey log book should contain the following items and the corresponding roman numerals: I —Aeroplane nationality and registration. II — Date. III — Names of crew members. IV — Duty assignments of crew members. V —Place of departure. VI — Place of arrival. VII — Time of departure. VIII — Time of arrival. IX — Hours of flight. X —Nature of flight (private, aerial work, scheduled or non-scheduled). XI — Incidents, observations, if any. XII — Signature of person in charge.

    11.4.2. Recommendation.— Entries in the journey log book should be made currently and in ink or indelible pencil.

    11.4.3 Recommendation.— Completed journey log book should be retained to provide a continuous record of the last six months’ operations.

    All the required information is contained on our "Flight and Maintenance" logs, of which at least the previous six months worth are retained in the aircraft maintenance log.

  3. Every aircraft of a contracting State, engaged in international navigation, shall carry the following documents in conformity with the conditions prescribed in this Convention. d) Its journey log book; [CC-29d ]
  4. All the required information is contained on our "Flight and Maintenance" logs, of which at least the previous six months worth are retained in the aircraft maintenance log.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A22)

Tab A22 Maintenance release

  1. A flight shall not be commenced until flight preparation forms have been completed certifying that the pilot-in-command is satisfied that: a) the aeroplane is airworthy; c) a maintenance release as prescribed in 8.8 has been issued in respect of the aeroplane; [A6-I-4.3.1(a)(c)] (Section 8.8 requires "a) basic details of the maintenance carried out including detailed reference of the approved data used; b) the date such maintenance was completed; c) when applicable, the identity of the approved maintenance organization; and d) the identity of the person or persons signing the release."
  2. A maintenance release is always obtained after maintenance or at intervals no longer than 20 flight days or 50 flight hours. The maintenance release is contained on a Flight and Maintenance Log, kept in the aircraft Maintenance Logbook. Company procedures require the pilot-in-command sign the Flight and Maintenance Log prior to the flight once all preflight inspections have been satisfactorily completed and a maintenance release has been issued.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A23)

Tab A23 Defect notification and rectification

  1. The pilot-in-command shall be responsible for reporting all known or suspected defects in the aeroplane, to the operator, at the termination of the flight. [A6-I-4.5.4]
  2. The pilot-in-command completes a flight and maintenance log at the completion of each flight, to include reporting all known or suspected defects. (Original kept in aircraft maintenance logbook.) The company director of maintenance is notified as soon as practical at the completion of each duty day.

  3. An operator shall ensure that the following records are kept for the periods mentioned in 8.4.2: a) the total time in service (hours, calendar time and cycles, as appropriate) of the aeroplane and all life-limited components; b) the current status of compliance with all mandatory continuing airworthiness information; c) appropriate details of modifications and repairs; d) the time in service (hours, calendar time and cycles, as appropriate) since the last overhaul of the aeroplane or its components subject to a mandatory overhaul life; compliance with the maintenance programme; and f) the detailed maintenance records to show that all requirements for the signing of a maintenance release have been met. 8.4.2 The records in 8.4.1 a) to e) shall be kept for a minimum period of 90 days after the unit to which they refer has been permanently withdrawn from service, and the records in 8.4.1 f) for a minimum period of one year after the signing of the maintenance release. 8.4.3 In the event of a temporary change of operator, the records shall be made available. [A6-I-8.4 8.4.1]
  4. The required maintenance records are kept on file for at least 90 days at the aircraft's base of operations. Additionally, a summary of inspections completed and due is kept in the aircraft maintenance logbook.

  5. The operator shall include in the operations manual a minimum equipment list (MEL), approved by the State of the Operator which will enable the pilot-in-command to determine whether a flight may be commenced or continued from any intermediate stop should any instrument, equipment or systems become inoperative. Where the State of the Operator is not the State of Registry, the State of the Operator shall ensure that the MEL does not affect the aeroplane's compliance with the Airworthiness requirements applicable in the State of Registry. [A6-I-6.1.3]
  6. The aircraft MEL is kept on the aircraft EFB.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Flight Deck (A24)

Tab A24 Preflight inspection

  1. A flight shall not be commenced until flight preparation forms have been completed certifying that the pilot-in-command is satisfied that: a) the aeroplane is airworthy; c) a maintenance release as prescribed in 8.8 has been issued in respect of the aeroplane; [A6-I-4.3.1(a)(c)]
  2. Company procedures require the pilot-in-command sign the Flight and Maintenance Log prior to the flight once all preflight inspections have been satisfactorily completed and a maintenance release has been issued.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B01)

Tab B01 General Internal Condition

  1. Check general condition, including lavatories, general condition and smoke detection systems, the condition of the overhead bins, flammable furnishings. Check the stowage of baggage/equipment, or heavy/hard pointed objects which might be stored in the toilets (waste bags temporarily stowed in a locked toilet is considered acceptable). [EASA SAFA Inspector's Guidance]
  2. Flight crews make this inspection prior to every flight.

  3. The operator shall ensure that all baggage carried onto an aeroplane and taken into the passenger cabin is adequately and securely stowed. [A6-I-4.8]
  4. The aircraft has a secured baggage compartment, equipped with nets, for this purpose. (See photo which follows)

  5. The operator shall include in the operations manual a minimum equipment list (MEL), approved by the State of the Operator which will enable the pilot-in command to determine whether a flight may be commenced or continued from any intermediate stop should any instrument, equipment or systems become inoperative. Where the State of the Operator is not the State of Registry, the State of the Operator shall ensure that the MEL does not affect the aeroplane’s compliance with the airworthiness requirements applicable in the State of Registry.[A6-I-6.1.3]
  6. MEL is held electronically in EFB.

Baggage Compartment

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B02)

Tab B02 Cabin Attendant’s Station/Crew Rest Area

  1. Check general condition and serviceability of the cabin crew seats. Note: If a cabin crew seat is found unserviceable check against MEL and check if the number of serviceable ones can accommodate the minimum required number of cabin crew members (information available in the Operations Manual). Note: If a cabin crew seat is found not to retract automatically impeding the rapid evacuation of the aeroplane in an emergency, this finding should be addressed under the item B12 – Access to emergency exit. Check presence and condition of the safety harness and/or belt. Note: Aeroplanes for which the individual CofA was issued on or after 1 January 1981 must be fitted with safety harnesses for the use of cabin crew members. Check accessibility of life jackets. Check the serviceability of the communication system (Cockpit to Cabin and Cabin to Cabin). In case of unserviceability, check against the MEL. [EASA SAFA Inspector's Guidance]
  2. We do not use cabin attendants.

  3. Aeroplanes for which the individual certificate of airworthiness is first issued on or after 1 January 1981 All aeroplanes shall be equipped with a forward or rearward facing (within 15 degrees of the longitudinal axis of the aeroplane) seat, fitted with a safety harness for the use of each cabin crew member required to satisfy the intent of 12.1 in respect of emergency evacuation. [A6-I-6.16.1 6.1]
  4. We do not use cabin attendants.

  5. Land planes shall carry the equipment prescribed in 6.5.2.2: a) when flying over water and at a distance of more than 93 km (50 NM) away from the shore, in the case of land planes operated in accordance with 5.2.9 or 5.2.10; b) when flying en route over water beyond gliding distance from the shore, in the case of all other land planes; and c) when taking off or landing at an aerodrome where, in the opinion of the State of the Operator, the take-off or approach path is so disposed over water that in the event of a mishap there would be a likelihood of a ditching. 6.5.2.2 The equipment referred to in 6.5.2.1 shall comprise one life jacket or equivalent individual flotation device for each person on board, stowed in a position easily accessible from the seat or berth of the person for whose use it is provided. [A6-I-6.5.2]
  6. We do not use cabin attendants.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B03)

Tab B03 First Aid Kit/Emergency Medical Kit

  1. Check for presence, accessibility, and identification of medical supplies. Note: A First-Aid kit or a Medical kit or a universal precaution kit is only an ICAO recommendation. Note: ICAO does not require First Aid Kits / Emergency Medical Kits/Universal precaution kits to have an expiration (or next check) date. A First Aid Kit, Emergency Medical Kit, Universal precaution kit without a date does not constitute a finding. However, if stated expiry date has been exceeded, then this should be reported as a finding. [EASA SAFA Inspector's Guidance]
  2. The aircraft has two medical kits, both checked for expiration. (Location on chart which follows)

  3. The operator shall inform the passengers of the location and general manner of use of the principal emergency equipment carried for collective use. [A6-I-4.2.12.2]
  4. Pilots ensure each pilot has received an appropriate briefing the first time on the aircraft and thereafter on request. Additionally, all passengers are briefed if any of the equipment has changed location or function. Passenger briefing cards are provided to new passengers and on request. (See copy which follows) Pilots are provided a "Aircraft Specific Information Card" to ensure briefings are complete. (See copy which follows)

  5. An aeroplane shall be equipped with: a) accessible and adequate medical supplies; Recommendation.- Medical supplies should comprise: 1) one or more first-aid kits for the use of cabin crew in managing incidents of ill health; and 2) for aeroplanes required to carry cabin crew as part of the operating crew, one universal precaution kit (two for aeroplanes authorized to carry more than 250 passengers) for the use of cabin crew members in managing incidents of ill health associated with a case of suspected communicable disease, or in the case of illness involving contact with body fluids; and. 3) for aeroplanes authorized to carry more than 100 passengers, on a sector length of more than two hours, a medical kit, for the use of medical doctors or other qualified persons in treating inflight medical emergencies. Note.- Guidance on the types, number, location and contents of the medical supplies is given in Attachment B. [6.2.2]
  6. The aircraft has two medical kits, both checked for expiration. (Location on chart which follows)

  7. Prescribed safety and survival equipment that the crew or passengers are expected to use or operate at the time of an emergency shall be reliable, readily accessible and easily identified, and its method of operation shall be plainly marked. [A8-IIIA-8.3 A8-V-6.3 A8-IIIB-6.3]
  8. The aircraft has two medical kits, both checked for expiration. (Location on chart which follows)

First Aid/Emergency Medical Kit location:

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B04)

Tab B04 Hand fire extinguishers

  1. Check if the installed extinguisher(s) is at the indicated location and easily accessible. Check if the installed extinguisher is correctly secured in its bracket. Check if the installed extinguisher(s) is marked with the appropriate operating instructions. Check if the installed extinguisher(s), including the extinguishing agent release mechanism, is serviceable – check pressure gauge (if installed), check expiration date (if any). If considerably low weight, consider it unserviceable. [EASA SAFA Inspector's Guidance]
  2. Fire extinguishers are checked on each preflight. (See location chart, which appears in Tab A15 of this binder)

  3. Prescribed safety and survival equipment that the crew or passengers are expected to use or operate at the time of an emergency shall be reliable, readily accessible and easily identified, and its method of operation shall be plainly marked.[A8-IIIA-8.3 A8-IIIB-6.3 A8-V-6.3]
  4. Equipment is positioned exactly as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness (See location chart which follows)

  5. A6-I-.2.2(b)(2) An aeroplane shall be equipped with: b) portable fire extinguishers of a type which, when discharged, will not cause dangerous contamination of the air within the aeroplane. At least one shall be located in: 2) each passenger compartment that is separate from the pilot's compartment and that is not readily accessible to the flight crew; Note.- Any portable fire extinguisher so fitted in accordance with the certificate of airworthiness of the aeroplane may count as one prescribed.
  6. Equipment is positioned exactly as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness (See location chart which follows)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B05)

Tab B05 Life jackets/Flotation devices

  1. 6.5.2.1 Land planes shall carry the equipment prescribed in 6.5.2.2: a) when flying over water and at a distance of more than 93 km (50 NM) away from the shore, in the case of land planes operated in accordance with 5.2.9 or 5.2.10; b) when flying en route over water beyond gliding distance from the shore, in the case of all other land planes; and c) when taking off or landing at an aerodrome where, in the opinion of the State of the Operator, the take-off or approach path is so disposed over water that in the event of a mishap there would be a likelihood of a ditching. 6.5.2.2 The equipment referred to in 6.5.2.1 shall comprise one life jacket or equivalent individual flotation device for each person on board, stowed in a position easily accessible from the seat or berth of the person for whose use it is provided. [A6-I-6.5.2]
  2. Life jackets are positioned exactly as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness (See location chart which follows)

Life Vests Positions

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B06)

Tab B06 Seat belt and seat condition

  1. An aeroplane shall be equipped with: c) 1) a seat or berth for each person over an age to be determined by the State of the Operator; 2) a seat belt for each seat and restraining belts for each berth; [A6-I-6.2.2(c)]
  2. The aircraft has 16 passenger seats, each with seat belts and restraining belts, installed under the original certificate of airworthiness (See location chart which follows)

  3. Aeroplanes over 5700 KG for which application for certification was submitted on or after 2 March 2004. 4.4.1 Seating and restraints Adequate seating and restraints shall be provided for the occupants, taking account of the likely flight and emergency landing loads to be encountered. Attention shall be paid to minimizing injury to occupants due to contact with surrounding structure during the operation of the aeroplane. [A8-IIIB-4.4.1]
  4. The aircraft has 16 passenger seats, each with seat belts and restraining belts, installed under the original certificate of airworthiness. (See location chart which follows)

Seating Diagram

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B07)

Tab B07 Emergency exit, lightning and marking, Torches

  1. The aeroplane shall be equipped with sufficient emergency exits to allow maximum opportunity for cabin evacuation within an appropriate time period. Items to be considered shall include: a) number of seats and seating configuration; b) number, location and size of exits; c) marking of exits and provision of instructions for use; d) likely blockages of exits; e) operation of exits; and f) positioning and weight of evacuation equipment at exits, e.g. slides and rafts. [A8-IIIB-8.4]
  2. The aircraft has four emergency exits as well as the main entrance and a secondary escape route; as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness. (See diagram which appears at Tab A02 of this binder)

  3. All aeroplanes, when operated at night shall be equipped with: f) an electric torch for each crew member station. [A6-I- 6.10(f)]
  4. Each pilot seat has an electric flashlight readily available, exactly as installed under the original certificate of airworthiness. (See photo which appears at Tab A19 of this binder)

  5. Emergency lighting shall be provided and shall have the following characteristics: a) independence from main electrical supply; b) automatic activation upon loss of normal power/impact; c) visual indication of the path to emergency exits in smoke filled cabin conditions; d) illumination both inside and outside the aeroplane during evacuation; and e) no additional hazard in the event of fuel spillage. [A8-IIIB-8.5]
  6. The aircraft has installed a qualified emergency lighting system. (See description from aircraft operating manual which follows)

Emergency Lighting System Description (Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2A-33-60)

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B08)

Tab B08 Slides/Life Rafts, ELT

  1. 6.5.3.1 In addition to the equipment prescribed in 6.5.1 or 6.5.2 whichever is applicable, the following equipment shall be installed in all aeroplanes when used over routes on which the aeroplane may be over water and at more than a distance corresponding to 120 minutes at cruising speed or 740 km (400 NM), whichever is the lesser, away from land suitable for making an emergency landing in the case of aircraft operated in accordance with 5.2.9 or 5.2.10, and 30 minutes or 185 km (100 NM), whichever is the lesser, for all other aeroplanes: a) life-saving rafts in sufficient numbers to carry all persons on board, stowed so as to facilitate their ready use in emergency, provided with such life-saving equipment including means of sustaining life as is appropriate to the flight to be undertaken; [A6-I-6.5.3.1(a)]
  2. There are two life rafts aboard, as originally installed under the original airworthiness certificate. (See diagram which follows)

  3. All aeroplanes authorized to carry 19 passengers or less for which the individual certificate of airworthiness is first issued after 1 July 2008 shall be equipped with at least one automatic ELT. [A6-I-6.17.11]
  4. The aircraft has a qualified ELT, installed under the original airworthiness certificate. (See operating manual extract, which follows)

  5. From 1 January 2005, emergency locator transmitters shall operate on 406 MHz and 121.5 MHz simultaneously. [A10-III-Ch.2- 5.1.4]
  6. The aircraft has a qualified ELT, installed under the original airworthiness certificate. (See operating manual extract, which follows)

Life Rafts

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ELT (G450 OM 2A-23-70)

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SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B09)

Tab B09 Oxygen Supply

  1. A flight to be operated at flight altitudes at which the atmospheric pressure in personnel compartments will be less than 700 hPa (10,000 feet) shall not be commenced unless sufficient stored breathing oxygen is carried to supply: a) all crew members and 10 per cent of the passengers for any period in excess of 30 minutes that the pressure in compartments occupied by them will be between 700 hPa and 620 hPa; and b) the crew and passengers for any period that the atmospheric pressure in compartments occupied by them will be less than 620 hPa (13,000 feet). [A6-I-4.3.8.1]
  2. Crews normally plan to be able to continue any flight no higher than 10,000 feet in the event of a pressurization loss and ensure oxygen quantity is sufficient using the chart available in G450-OMS-01, Table III. (See extract at Tab A18)

  3. An aeroplane intended to be operated at flight altitudes at which the atmospheric pressure is less than 700 hPa (10,000 feet) in personnel compartments shall be equipped with oxygen storage and dispensing apparatus capable of storing and dispensing the oxygen supplies required in Annex 6 Part I Chapter 4.3.8.1. [A6-I-6.7.1]
  4. Oxygen masks are readily available, exactly as installed under the original airworthiness certificate. (See operating manual extract at Tab A18)

  5. A flight to be operated at flight altitudes at which the atmospheric pressure in personnel compartments will be less than 700 hPa (10,000 feet) shall not be commenced unless sufficient stored breathing oxygen is carried to supply: a) all crew members and 10 per cent of the passengers for any period in excess of 30 minutes that the pressure in compartments occupied by them will be between 700 hPa (10,000 feet) and 620 hPa (13,000 feet); and b) the crew and passengers for any period that the atmospheric pressure in compartments occupied by them will be less than 620 hPa (13,000 feet). [A6-I-4.3.8.1]
  6. Crews normally plan to be able to continue any flight no higher than 10,000 feet in the event of a pressurization loss and ensure oxygen quantity is sufficient using the chart available in G450-OMS-01, Table III. (See extract at Tab A18)

  7. An aeroplane intended to be operated at flight altitudes at which the atmospheric pressure is less than 376 hPa (25,000 feet), or which, if operated at flight altitudes at which the atmospheric pressure is more than 376 hPa (25,000 feet), cannot descend safely within four minutes to a flight altitude at which the atmospheric pressure is equal to 620 hPa (13,000 feet) and for which the individual certificate of airworthiness is first issued on or after 9 November 1998, shall be provided with automatically deployable oxygen equipment to satisfy the requirements of Annex 6 Part I Chapter 4.3.8.2. The total number of oxygen dispensing units shall exceed the number of passenger and cabin crew seats by at least 10 per cent. [A6-I-6.7.5]
  8. The aircraft is equipped with an automatically deployable oxygen system, as installed under the original airworthiness certificate. (See operating manual extract at Tab A18)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B10)

Tab B10 Safety instructions

  1. An operator shall ensure that passengers are made familiar with the location and use of: a) seat belts; b) emergency exits; c) life jackets, if the carriage of life jackets is prescribed; d) oxygen dispensing equipment, if the provision of oxygen for the use of passengers is prescribed; and e) other emergency equipment provided for individual use, including passenger emergency briefing cards. [A6-I-4.2.12.1]
  2. Pilots ensure each pilot has received an appropriate briefing the first time on the aircraft and thereafter on request. Additionally, all passengers are briefed if any of the equipment has changed location or function. Passenger briefing cards are provided to new passengers and on request. (See copy at Tab B03 of this binder) Pilots are provided a "Aircraft Specific Information Card" to ensure briefings are complete. (See copy at Tab B03 of this binder)

  3. A6-I-6.2.2 (d) An aeroplane shall be equipped with: d) means of ensuring that the following information and instructions are conveyed to passengers: 1) when seat belts are to be fastened; 2) when and how oxygen equipment is to be used if the carriage of oxygen is required; 3) restrictions on smoking; 4) location and use of life jackets or equivalent individual floatation devices where their carriage is required; and 5) location and method of opening emergency exits;
  4. Pilots ensure each pilot has received an appropriate briefing the first time on the aircraft and thereafter on request. Additionally, all passengers are briefed if any of the equipment has changed location or function. Passenger briefing cards are provided to new passengers and on request. (See copy at Tab B03 of this binder) Pilots are provided a "Aircraft Specific Information Card" to ensure briefings are complete. (See copy at Tab B03 of this binder)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B11)

Tab B11 Cabin crew members

  1. An operator shall establish, to the satisfaction of the State of the Operator, the minimum number of cabin attendants required for each type of aeroplane, based on seating capacity or the number of passengers carried, in order to effect a safe and expeditious evacuation of the aeroplane, and the necessary functions to be performed in an emergency or a situation requiring emergency evacuation. The operator shall assign these functions for each type of aeroplane. [A6-I-12.1]
  2. No cabin attendants are required or used on this aircraft.

  3. An aeroplane shall not be refuelled when passengers are embarking, on board or disembarking unless it is properly attended by qualified personnel ready to initiate and direct an evacuation of the aeroplane by most practical and expeditious means available. [A6-I-4.3.2]
  4. When refuelling with passengers embarking, on board or disembarking, two-way communication shall be maintained by the aeroplane's inter-communication system or other suitable means between the ground crew supervising the refuelling and the qualified personnel on board the aeroplane. [A6-I-4.3.7]
  5. The company operations manual lists appropriate procedures for refueling operations when passengers are embarking, on board, or disembarking. (See extract which follows)

  6. An operator shall formulate rules to limit flight time and flight duty periods and for the provision of adequate rest periods for all its crew members. These rules shall be in accordance with the regulations established by the State of the Operator, or approved by that State, and included in the operations manual. [A6-I-4.2.11.2]
  7. The company operations manual includes appropriate flight time and duty period limitations. (See extract at Tab A01 of this binder)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B11)

Company Manual Extract - Refueling Procedures

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B12)

Tab B12 Access to emergency exits

  1. Aeroplanes over 5700 KG for which application for certification was submitted on or after 2 March 2004. The aeroplane shall be equipped with sufficient emergency exits to allow maximum opportunity for cabin evacuation within an appropriate time period. Items to be considered shall include: a) number of seats and seating configuration; b) number, location and size of exits; c) marking of exits and provision of instructions for use; d) likely blockages of exits; e) operation of exits; and f) positioning and weight of evacuation equipment at exits, e.g. slides and rafts. [A8-IIIB-8.4]
  2. Four emergency escape exits and alternate routes are shown in the Aircraft Flight Manual 4-19-30. (See extract at Tab A02 of this binder)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B13)

Tab B13 Safety of passenger baggage

  1. The operator shall ensure that all baggage carried onto an aeroplane and taken into the passenger cabin is adequately and securely stowed. [A6-I-4.8]
  2. The aircraft has a secured baggage compartment, equipped with nets, for this purpose. (See photo at Tab B01 of this binder)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Safety/Cabin (B14)

Tab B14 Seat capacity

  1. An aeroplane shall be equipped with: c) 1) a seat or berth for each person over an age to be determined by the State of the Operator. [A6-I-6.2.2(c)(1)]
  2. The aircraft has 16 passenger seats, each with seat belts and restraining belts, installed under the original certificate of airworthiness. (See location chart at Tab B06 of this binder)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C01)

Tab C01 General External Condition

  1. Check general condition of the airframe:  corrosion;  cleanliness (related to the ability to inspect the aircraft);  presence of ice, snow, frost;  legibility of markings. Note: Although missing underwing registrations are a non-compliance with international requirements, the safety relevance is considered low. Therefore, such non-compliance should be recorded as a General Remark (cat G) only. Note: markings may be in languages other than English. Note: ICAO does not require that break-in points need to be marked (however: if such markings are being used, they should be according to a certain format). Note: When inspecting markings and placards, inspectors should differentiate between those required by ICAO and those required only by the manufacturer.  Loose or missing fasteners and rivets  Presence and condition of the antennas  Presence and condition of the static dischargers  Condition and functionality of the exterior lights etc. Note: Before raising a finding, the inspector should make sure that the affected light(s) are required for the type of flight (according to the MEL). Unserviceable lights, not required for the type of flight, should be reported as a General Remark only. [EASA SAFA Inspector's Guidance]
  2. Crews make such an inspection prior to every flight.

  3. Markings and placards or instructions shall be provided to give any information that is essential to the ground crew in order to preclude the possibility of mistakes in ground servicing (e.g. towing, refuelling) that could pass unnoticed and that could jeopardize the safety of the aeroplane in subsequent flights. [A8-IIIA-9.6.2 A8-IIIB-7.6.2 A8-V-7.6.2]
  4. Aircraft is placarded as delivered under the original airworthiness certificate.

  5. All aeroplanes, when operated at night shall be equipped with: b) the lights required by Annex 2 for aircraft in flight or operating on the movement area of an aerodrome; c) two landing lights;
  6. Aircraft is equipped with a full set of suitable exterior lights. (See aircraft operating manual extract, which follows)

  7. A flight to be planned or expected to operate in suspected or known ground icing conditions shall not take off unless the aeroplane has been inspected for icing and, if necessary, has been given appropriate de-icing/anti-icing treatment. Accumulation of ice or other naturally occurring contaminants shall be removed so that the aeroplane is kept in an airworthy condition prior to take-off. [A6-I-4.3.5.4]
  8. Crews conduct pre-flight contamination checks to determine the need for de-icing/anti-icing treatment and further pre-takeoff contamination checks if the aircraft was de-iced and/or the conditions are conducive for icing conditions.

Exterior Lighting (G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2A-33-50 Extract)

images

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C02)

Tab C02 Doors and Hatches

  1. Check for: presence and condition of bonding wires; door external markings, operation instructions; Note: only those doors which can be opened from the outside need external markings.  condition of doors, hatches and associated seals.
  2. Checks are made during every maintenance release inspection, at intervals no longer than 20 flight days or 50 flight hours, and documented in the Maintenance Logbook.

  3. Markings and placards or instructions shall be provided to give any information that is essential to the ground crew in order to preclude the possibility of mistakes in ground servicing (e.g. towing, refuelling) that could pass unnoticed and that could jeopardize the safety of the aeroplane in subsequent flights. [A8-IIIA-9.6.2 A8-IIIB-7.6.2 A8-V-7.6.2]
  4. Aircraft is placarded as delivered under the original airworthiness certificate.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C03)

Tab C03 Flight Controls

  1. Check external Flight Controls. Check for hydraulic leakage. Check presence and condition of the static dischargers. Check presence and condition of bonding wires.
  2. Crews make such a check prior to every flight.

  3. Any failure to maintain an aircraft in an airworthy condition as defined by the appropriate airworthiness requirements shall render the aircraft ineligible for operation until the aircraft is restored to an airworthy condition. [A8-II-3.5]
  4. Crews make conduct a preflight inspection prior to every flight.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C04)

Tab C04 Wheels, tyres and brakes

  1. Inspect wheels and tyres for damage and wear. When possible, check for correct tyre pressure. Check the condition of the braking system. Check the condition of the landing gear snubbers. Note: some aircraft manufacturers may approve a certain amount of flights with tires or brakes worn out or damaged beyond AMM limits.
  2. A thorough inspection is made prior to every maintenance release, conducted at intervals no greater than 20 flight days and 50 flight hours. Crews also make a preflight inspection prior to every flight.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C05)

Tab C05 Undercarriage, skids/floats

  1. Check presence and condition of the water/debris deflectors (if required to be installed). Check skids/floats for obvious damages. Check for presence and legibility of inspection markings/placards. Note: When inspecting markings and placards, inspectors should differentiate between those required by ICAO and those required only by the manufacturer. Check for condition, lubrication, corrosion, leaks, damage and inappropriate strut extension.
  2. A thorough inspection is made prior to every maintenance release, conducted at intervals no greater than 20 flight days and 50 flight hours. Crews also make a preflight inspection prior to every flight.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C06)

Tab C06 Wheel well

  1. Check for lubrication, leakage & corrosion. Check for lubrication, leakage & corrosion and wear on door fittings and hinges. Check for presence and condition of bonding wires. Check for cleanliness and damage.
  2. A thorough inspection is made prior to every maintenance release, conducted at intervals no greater than 20 flight days and 50 flight hours. Crews also make a preflight inspection prior to every flight.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C07)

Tab C07 Powerplant and Pylon

  1. Check for: dents and loose/missing fasteners; LPT/LPC blades (where visible), obvious damage to sensors; cracks; panels are aligned and handles are flushed; unusual damage and leaks; the condition of the thrust reverser; the condition of the Intake acoustic liners; presence and legibility of the markings and placards. Note: When inspecting markings and placards, inspectors should differentiate between those required by ICAO and those required only by the manufacturer.
  2. A thorough inspection is made prior to every maintenance release, conducted at intervals no greater than 20 flight days and 50 flight hours. Crews also make a preflight inspection prior to every flight.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C08)

Tab C08 Fan blades

  1. Check for FOD damage, cracks, cuts, corrosion, erosion, etc.
  2. A thorough inspection is made prior to every maintenance release, conducted at intervals no greater than 20 flight days and 50 flight hours. Crews also make a preflight inspection prior to every flight.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C09)

Tab C09 Propellers, rotors (main/tail)

  1. Check for corrosion, looseness of blades in hub, stone damage, etc. Check the de-ice boots for damage (where fitted).
  2. Not Applicable.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C10)

Tab C10 Obvious repairs

  1. Check for repairs of unusual design or poorly performed. Note: There is no obligation to keep information on board regarding temporary repairs (e.g. on the dent & buckle chart). However, the PIC has to have the knowledge of the status of the temporary repairs in order to be satisfied that the aeroplane remains airworthy.
  2. A thorough inspection is made prior to every maintenance release, conducted at intervals no greater than 20 flight days and 50 flight hours. Crews also make a preflight inspection prior to every flight.

  3. A flight shall not be commenced until flight preparation forms have been completed certifying that the pilot-in-command is satisfied that: a) the aeroplane is airworthy; [A6-I-4.3.1(a)]
  4. Company procedures require the pilot-in-command sign the Flight and Maintenance Log prior to the flight once all preflight inspections have been satisfactorily completed and a maintenance release has been issued.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C11)

Tab C11 Obvious unrepaired damage

  1. Check for un-assessed and unrecorded damage including corrosion, lightning strike damage, bird strikes etc. Check that any damage is observed, assessed, and possibly recorded on a damage chart/buckle & dent chart.
  2. A thorough inspection is made prior to every maintenance release, conducted at intervals no greater than 20 flight days and 50 flight hours. Crews also make a preflight inspection prior to every flight.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Aircraft Condition (C12)

Tab C12 Leakage

  1. Check for fuel leaks, hydraulic leaks and (if applicable) toilet liquid leaks (blue ice). Note: Leakages identified when inspecting C03, C04, C05, C06 and C07 should be reported as findings under those inspection items.
  2. A thorough inspection is made prior to every maintenance release, conducted at intervals no greater than 20 flight days and 50 flight hours. Crews also make a preflight inspection prior to every flight.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Cargo (D01)

Tab D01 General Condition of Cargo Compartment

  1. Check the general condition of cargo compartment. Check lighting, fire protection, detection & extinguishing system (if appropriate). Check side wall and overhead (blow-out) panels, smoke detectors, smoke barrier/curtain. Check the presence and condition of cargo barrier/dividing nets.
  2. A thorough inspection is made prior to every maintenance release, conducted at intervals no greater than 20 flight days and 50 flight hours. Crews also make a preflight inspection prior to every flight.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Cargo (D02)

Tab D02 Dangerous Goods

  1. The operator of an aircraft in which dangerous goods are to be carried shall provide the pilot-in-command as early as practicable before departure of the aircraft with written information as specified in the Technical Instructions. [A18-9.1]
  2. We do not carry dangerous goods. (See our company manual extract at Tab A04 of this binder)

  3. Packages of dangerous goods bearing the “Cargo aircraft only” label shall be loaded in accordance with the provisions in the Technical Instructions. [A18-8.9]
  4. We do not carry dangerous goods. (See our company manual extract at Tab A04 of this binder)

  5. An operator shall not accept dangerous goods for transport by air: a) unless the dangerous goods are accompanied by a completed dangerous goods transport document, except where the Technical Instructions indicate that such a document is not required; and b) until the package, overpack or freight container containing the dangerous goods has been inspected in accordance with the acceptance procedures contained in the Technical Instructions. [A18-8.1]
  6. We do not carry dangerous goods. (See our company manual extract at Tab A04 of this binder)

SAFA Inspection Preparation — Cargo [D03]

Tab D03 Safety of Cargo on Board

  1. Check that loads are properly distributed (floor limits, height limits, pallets and containers maximum gross weight). Note: Not all aircraft have load height restrictions. Check that flight/fly-away kit and spare wheels are correctly secured. Check that cargo is correctly secured. Check the condition of cargo containers, pallets, lock assemblies and lashing nets. Check the condition of the cargo compartment dividing nets.
  2. Aircraft is loaded considering weight and balance restrictions. (See example weight and balance form at Tab A14 of this binder)

  3. A flight shall not be commenced until flight preparation forms have been completed certifying that the pilot-in-command is satisfied that: e) any load carried is properly distributed and safely secured. [A6-I-4.3.1e]
  4. Company procedures require the pilot-in-command sign the Flight and Maintenance Log prior to the flight once all preflight inspections have been satisfactorily completed and a maintenance release has been issued.

SAFA Inspection Preparation — General (E01)

Tab E01 General

  1. Check (if appropriate) for any general item which may have a direct relation with the safety of the aircraft or its occupants.
  2. Company procedures require the pilot-in-command sign the Flight and Maintenance Log prior to the flight once all preflight inspections have been satisfactorily completed and a maintenance release has been issued.

Book Notes

Portions of this page can be found in the book International Operations Flight Manual, Part VIII, Chapter 33.

References

Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, Revision 35, April 30, 2013.

Gulfstream G450 Aircraft Service Change 077 TCAS 7.1 Installation

This service change activates the Controller Pilot Data Link Communication (CPDLC) functionality.

Gulfstream G450 Airplane Flight Manual, Revision 36, December 5, 2013

ICAO Annex 6 - Operation of Aircraft - Part 1 Commercial Aircraft, International Standards and Recommended Practices, Annex 6 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, Part I, July 2010

ICAO Annex 6 - Operation of Aircraft - Part 2 General Aviation, International Standards and Recommended Practices, Annex 6 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, Part II, July 2008

ICAO Doc 4444 - Air Traffic Management, 16th Edition, Procedures for Air Navigation Services, International Civil Aviation Organization, October 2016

SAFA Ramp Inspections Guidance Material, European Aviation Safety Agency, Approvals & Standardisation Directorate, Version 2.0, 2012

SAFA Ramp Inspection Report, Official Journal of the European Union, 30.4.2004.

Revision: 20170526
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