CPDLC Checklist

Communications

Eddie sez:

One of the odd things about the CPDLC approval process is the FAA leaves the checklist up to you but doesn't know enough about data link to really QC yours. The other problem is that many manufacturers don't provide a checklist either.

Most of the photos are from my previous aircraft, a Gulfstream G450. The checklist procedures started from the Gulfstream suggestion, handed to us in the form of a photocopy three generations removed from the original and doctored as we saw fit. These procedures might not work for your aircraft or even for a G450 that has been upgraded since we wrote this, ten years ago.

This checklist, and the printed Data Link Checklist, is designed for a generic aircraft to get you started. You will have to tailor it for your aircraft and operation.

Everything here is from the references shown below, with a few comments in an alternate color.

  1. CPDLC Preflight Setup
  2. CPDLC Log On
  3. CPDLC Latency Timer
  4. Downlink Oceanic Clearance From DSP (Applies to all except NY Center)
  5. Downlink Oceanic Clearance from NY Center (via CPDLC)
  6. CPDLC Coast Out
  7. CPDLC Crossing an FIR Boundary
  8. CPDLC Crossing an OCA Boundary
  9. Exit CPDLC and ADS-C Airspace

Last revision:

2020-12-16


CPDLC Preflight Setup

Flight Bag

Ensure you have the following either in paper, on the EFB, or your iPad:

Review the Latest ICAO NAT Ops Bulletins

ICAO NAT Ops Bulletins

This is a good source of the latest changes affecting data link operations in the North Atlantic.

ATC Flight Plan

  • Verify Block 7 — Aircraft Identification agrees with FMS Flight ID
  • (IAW ICAO Doc 10037, ¶4.2.1.2)

  • Verify Block 10A — Equipment Code contains “J3” and "J5" – Data Link System
  • Verify Block 10B — Equipment Code contains “D1” – ADS

Master Document / En Route Charts

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Figure: CPDLC/ADC-C Logon Addresses, from ICAO Doc 10037, Figure 401.

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Figure: Data Link Services by CTA, from ICAO Doc 10037, Appendix B, Table B-NAT-1.

  • Annotate FIR boundaries
  • Check FIRs versus ICAO Document 10037 Appendix B and make note of:
    • CPDLC status
    • ADS-C status
    • AFN address
    • Any instructions under “Remarks”

There are international procedures courses that preach making note of the ATSU addresses and checking that in your CPDLC pages. I've not found a requirement for that and after doing this for a few years have never found it to be useful.

Confirm COM/NAV3 in Data Mode

If your avionics requires it:

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Downlink the Flight Plan

(This confirms the data link is working.)

1. Press DLK and select FLT PLAN.

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2. Enter the flight plan number.

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3. Press SEND RQST

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4. The system responds "SENDING"

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5. When the flight plan is downlinked you will see "FLT PLAN RECEIVED" in the MCDU scratch pad. Press FPL REVIEW.

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6. Press ACTIVATE.

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Check VHF Data Link (VDL)

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  • DLK > SYSTEM > DATALINK MGR

If data link is in GND VHF (VDL) mode, test as follows. Otherwise, if data link is SAT, check VHF (VDL) when airborne.

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If GND VHF (VDL) mode is not available from your current ground location, as shown, check VHF (VDL) when airborne.


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DLK > STATUS > TEST


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DATALINK SEND


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The system responds "SENDING"


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You should immediately be notified of a MESSAGE UPLINK.


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You should have two messages as a result.


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The first, the uplink, is simply the test going out.


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The second confirms your data link was received over VHF.


Confirm FMS Settings for CPDLC

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Confirm Flight ID entered into TCAS details page of FMS agrees with Block 7 of Flight Plan


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Confirm data link is operational:

  • DLK
  • SYSTEM
  • DATALINK MGR
  • VHF and SATCOM available

CPDLC Log On

So long as you are NLT 10 minutes and NET 25 minutes, the log on process is pretty quick, which is to say you will see the "ACCEPTED" message. "ATC COMM ESTABLISHED" happens just prior to getting to the airspace and "ADS ESTABLISH" as you are entering. (Remember, CPDLC is analogous to voice contact, ADS to radar contact.) If you are very close to data link airspace, say at EINN about to head west, you might have to do this while still on the ground.

Most of the photos are from my aircraft, the checklist procedures started from a Gulfstream example, handed to us in the form of a photocopy three generations removed from the original and doctored as we saw fit. Of course this checklist is for a Gulfstream G450, it probably needs some adjusting for other aircraft.

When to Log On

[ICAO Doc 10037, ¶4.2.2]

  • When operating outside data link airspace, the flight crew should initiate a logon 10 to 25 minutes prior to entry into airspace where data link services are provided.
  • Note.— When departing an aerodrome close to or within such airspace, this may require the logon to be initiated prior to departure.

  • Where a data link service is only provided in upper airspace and where local procedures do not dictate otherwise, the flight crew should log on to that ATS unit in whose airspace a data link service will first be used.
  • When failure of a data link connection is detected, the flight crew should terminate the connection and then initiate a new logon with the current ATS unit.

Log On (G450 Example)

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Go to ATC LOG ON STATUS PAGE (DLK > ATC LOGON)

  • Ensure FLT ID and TAIL NO are correct
  • IAW: ICAO Doc 10037, para;4.2.1.

  • Ensure ADS ARMED
  • Ensure ADS EMERGENCY mode OFF (goes to OFF when first ARMED)
  • On second page, ensure ATC COMM is ARMED (“ATC COMM” is Honeywell’s name for CPDLC)
  • Back to first page, enter LOGON ID for FIR from ICAO Doc 10037 Appendix B, En Route Charts.
  • SEND

You see should “ACCEPTED” on the LOGON field; the ACT CTR (Active Center) remains blank until our flight is handed over to this center.

All communications domestically will be over VHF until the day domestic centers adopt CPDLC and ADS will most likely not be used when radar coverage exists.

Once handed over to an ATSU with CPDLC, you should see “ATC COMM ESTABLISHED” in the scratch pad, the LOGON TO field goes blank, and the center’s identifier in the ATC CTR field.

ATC Comm Established (G450)

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Sometime prior to airspace entry, you should see "ATC COMM ESTABLISHED" and the ACT CTR field should indicate the data link FIR. Page 2 will show ATC COMM is ACTIVE.

ADS Established (G450)

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If you are also in a location with ADS, you will also receive notification ADS ESTABLISHED and the ADS will go from ARMED to ACTIVE. You will probably not see this domestically and there are still a few oceanic areas with CPDLC but without ADS.

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You should review the ADS Contracts by going to NAV > ATC > ADS REVIEW

All of the periodic contracts will be listed except for the "Basic" data group which exists for all contracts and includes latitude, longitude, altitude, time, TCAS health, number of long range nav systems, and the nav system accuracy.

Note that the WPT CHG trigger means way point position reports will be made automatically.

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Note that the order of the pages depends on the order the contracts were received, you may get the event contracts first or the periodic, and they may be mixed between ATSUs.

CPDLC Confirmation (G450)

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Some ATSUs will send a confirmation:

NAV > ATC pulls up the confirmation message. Review page 2, ACCEPT, and SEND.
You are now logged on.

You might get a latency timer message and will need to respond. (This requirement should eventually disappear as the older equipment on some airliners is eventually replaced.)

Downlink Oceanic Clearance From DSP (Applies to all except NY Center)

This is how we down linked our oceanic clearances before we knew anything about CPDLC, it is basically coming from the "Data Link Service Provider," which means somebody one position removed from ATC. As of January 2017, this is how you downlink your oceanic from everyone except New York Center.

For that, see: CPDCL - Downlink Oceanic Clearance from NY Oceanic (via CPDLC).

Eastbound North Atlantic Notes

  • Gander ACC sends the clearance to the GDC 10 to 60 min prior to aircraft entry into oceanic airspace. Gander ACC generally sends the clearance by 70° West longitude.
  • For aircraft departing Gander (CYQX), Goose Bay (CYYR), and St. John's (CYYT) airports, Gander ACC sends the oceanic clearance to the GDC at the same time it sends the departure clearance to the tower. Read back of the oceanic clearance is given to the tower, after which the tower issues the departure clearance.
  • With automatic position reports enabled, the GDC automatically sends the clearance to the aircraft as a datalink message as soon as it is received from Gander ACC.
  • If automatic position reports are disabled, the flight crew must request the clearance. Begin requesting the clearance approaching 70° West longitude, but if the clearance is not received by 25 min prior to entry into oceanic airspace, contact Gander ACC on the appropriate voice frequency.
  • If the GDC has received the oceanic clearance from Gander ACC, the clearance is sent to the aircraft as a datalink message. If the GDC has not received the oceanic clearance from Gander ACC, a datalink message indicating that the oceanic clearance has not been received from Gander ACC and that the oceanic clearance can be requested again in 10 min is sent to the aircraft.
  • Multiple oceanic clearance requests can be sent until 25 min prior to entry into oceanic airspace. Oceanic clearances are valid for 30 min beyond the issue time and voice read back of oceanic clearances is required.

Westbound North Atlantic Notes

  • Delivery of oceanic clearances by way of datalink for westbound transatlantic flights for the Shanwick Oceanic Control Area (OCA) is known as Oceanic Route Clearance Authorization (ORCA) and requires that the aircraft be registered with the GDC for the service.
  • ORCA does not support use of variable call signs. The flight crew should request the clearance by way of datalink between 30 and 90 min prior to entry into the Shanwick OCA. Shanwick normally responds to the clearance request with a message indicating that the clearance should be received within the next 15 min. Shanwick then sends the clearance to the aircraft, which contains:
    • The aircraft registration
    • Entry point, ETA at the entry point
    • Mach number
    • Flight level
    • Route
    • Destination.
  • The flight crew must promptly acknowledge the clearance by way of datalink, by line selecting ACKNOWLEDGE on the message page containing the clearance. Failure to promptly acknowledge the clearance results in cancellation of the clearance transaction and requires that Shanwick be contacted by voice. Upon receipt of the clearance acknowledgement, Shanwick sends a message to the aircraft confirming the clearance. If this message is not received, Shanwick must be contacted by voice. If the flight crew requests a new clearance or if Shanwick requires a change to an existing clearance, one or more reclearances may be received by the flight crew. These reclearances are annotated RECLEARANCE 1, RECLEARANCE 2, etc., although may not necessarily be numbered consecutively.

G450 Procedures: Oceanic Clearance from a DSP

How you get a data link oceanic clearance everywhere in the world except from NY Center

[G450 Aircraft Operating Manual, §2B-21-40, ¶2.F.]

  • Delivery of oceanic clearances by way of datalink for Eastbound transatlantic flights is available from Gander Area Control Centre (ACC) to EPIC CMF-equipped aircraft. The aircraft, including any variable callsigns, must be registered through the GDC with Gander.
  • Gander ACC sends the clearance to the GCD 10 to 60 minutes prior to aircraft entry into oceanic airspace. For aircraft in flight, Gander ACC generally sends the clearance by 70° West longitude. For aircraft departing Gander (CYQX), Goose Bay (CYYR), and St. John's (CYYT) airports, Gander ACC sends the oceanic clearance to the GDC at the same time it sends the departure clearance to the tower. Readback of the oceanic clearance is given to the tower, after which the tower issues the departure clearance.
  • With automatic position reports enabled, the GDC automatically sends the clearance to the aircraft as a datalink message as soon as it is received from Gander ACC. If automatic position reports are disabled, the flight crew must request the clearance. Refer to the Eastbound Oceanic Clearances procedure later in this section for detailed instructions to request an oceanic clearance for an eastbound transatlantic flight. Begin requesting the clearance approaching 70° West longitude, but if the clearance is not received by 25 minutes prior to entry into oceanic airspace, contact Gander ACC on the appropriate voice frequency. If the GDC has received the oceanic clearance from Gander ACC, the clearance is sent to the aircraft as a datalink message. If the GDC has not received the oceanic clearance from Gander ACC, a datalink message indicating that the oceanic clearance has not been received from Gander ACC and that the oceanic clearance can be requested again in 10 minutes is sent to the aircraft. Multiple oceanic clearance requests can be sent until 25 minutes prior to entry into oceanic airspace. Oceanic clearances are valid for 30 minutes beyond the issue time and voice readback of oceanic clearances is required.

The book used to say to add "AGCS EQUIPPED" for coast out with Gander and we've always done it that way. That has changed:

[NAT OPS Bulletin 2015-01] Connecting to System

3.2 Flights equipped to send an RCL should:

  • Not include ‘AGCS’ in field 18 of the ICAO flight plan; and
  • Follow the procedures in Section 4 – Requesting Clearance.

3.3 Flights not equipped to send an RCL, but equipped to receive a data link oceanic clearance should:

  • Include ‘AGCS’ in field 18 of the ICAO flight plan; and
  • Expect to receive their data link oceanic clearances automatically. If the data link oceanic clearance is not received by 30 minutes prior to the OEP, the oceanic clearance must be requested via voice.

In the case of G450, for example, since we have the ability to request the clearance through a Request for Clearance (RCL) message, they expect us to do so.

All oceanic areas, except New York, deliver oceanic clearances through a data link service provider, not CPDLC. Your clearance may come unsolicited. If not, download through the Aeronautical Operational Communication (AOC) page of the FMS by pressing the DLK key:

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Photo: MCDU AOC (DLK) Menu, from Eddie's aircraft.

Press ATS (LSK 2R)

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Photo: MCDU ATS Menu, from Eddie's aircraft.

Select OCEANIC REQ (LSK 4L)

These AOC services are known by most airlines as ACARS. The Air Traffic Services Menu is where you will find oceanic options.

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Photo: MCDU CLX Page, from Eddie's aircraft.

The ENTRY POINT and ENTRY TIME blanks are mandatory. The REQ MACH and REQ FL are taken from the FMS and may be changed if needed.

Once the mandatory entries are made you will get at SEND prompt at LSK 6R. Pressing SEND will result in a "SENT" line with the time.

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Photo: MCDU Oceanic Clearance, from Eddie's aircraft.

When the clearance is received the scratch pad will say "ATC MESSAGE" and then pressing DLK will give you the clearance page.

Acknowledge the clearance and print.

Downlink Oceanic Clearance from NY Center (via CPDLC)

As of January 2017, New York Center is the only place you can get your oceanic clearance via CPDLC. For everywhere else, see: Downlink Oceanic Clearance From DSP (Applies to all except NY Center).

You normally get your oceanic clearance from an HF radio operator or from a Data Link Service Provider (DSP). The one exception today is from New York Center, who prefer to send your clearance directly via CPDLC.

This offers you the advantage of down linking the exact clearance into your FMS flight plan, avoiding the common error of flying your preprogrammed flight plan and not your clearance.

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You will have already logged on and received ADS contracts from New York. You will get the usual ATC message alert:

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The ATC Index message reveals the clearance:

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You now only have 60 seconds to respond and if you don't, the next message will likely be holding instructions. You are best off reviewing it very quickly, selecting ACCEPT, then SEND, and only then REVIEW carefully.

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When you review it, you are likely to see "LL01" and so forth where you were hoping to see a series of latitudes/longitudes or better yet the ARINC 424 Shorthand codes for the same. You should accept the clearance and send.

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Once you've accepted the clearance, an ACTIVATE prompt appears. You now can take a little more time to study the clearance in detail.

Selecting REVIEW allows you to see each page, including the series of LL01, LL02, and so on. You will also have a prompt for ATC CLEARANCE where you will see the clearance expressed with the full latitude and longitude of those LL01s and so forth.

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If you are satisfied this is what you want, you can select ACTIVATE and the points will be inserted into your flight plan.

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You will get a CONFIRM prompt before the points are inserted into your flight plan. All existing points will be pushed to the bottom and you will have some housecleaning to do.

Note: if the clearance is an exact match, you may want to refrain from using ACTIVATE to avoid losing the very tidy 3050N nomenclature.

CPDLC Coast Out

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Figure: ATC Comm Established Message, from Eddie's aircraft.

Once you've logged on and have your oceanic clearance, the coast out process is fairly simple. The following is an expansion of the CPDLC coast out procedures in our CPDLC checklist.

G450 CPDCL Oceanic Coast Out Example

When given a hand off to HF, the initial steps are the same . . .

  • "November seven seven zero zero, contact Shanwick Radio on three four seven six primary or eight eight niner one secondary."
  • You thank them as usual, change frequencies, and check in with Shanwick . . .
  • "Shanwick Radio, November seven seven zero zero, CPDLC, Gander Next, flight level four one zero, request SELCAL check Alpha Bravo Charlie Delta."
  • The response should be along the following: "November seven seven zero zero, Shanwick Radio, SELCAL check OK, voice reports not required in Shanwick OCA, at 30 West contact Gander on three zero one six primary or five five niner eight secondary."
  • If the SELCAL checks, you do not need to monitor the HF. With good CPDLC, ADS-C, and a WAYPT contract, you shouldn't have to make HF position reports either.
  • You should see ATC COMM ESTABLISHED in the FMS and the ATSU in the ACT CTR field.
  • With most ATSU's around the world you will also need to send a position report. (This is not required in the North Atlantic.) Check the GOLD Appendix E Remarks to check an ATSU's requirement.
  • More about this: CPDLC Manual Position Report.

Regional Procedures

If only it were this easy! Each region seems to have its own peculiar procedures that you may or may not pick up in Appendix B of ICAO Doc 10037. When coasting out of Gander heading east, for example, the VHF radio operator may be the same person handling the HF duties and may ask you for a position report on VHF in lieu of your first position report on HF. The radio operator wants you to include the term "CPDLC" to understand you will be using data link. Yes, the radio operator should have that information via your filed flight plan. But I would include the term "CPDLC" just to be sure.

CPDLC Crossing an FIR Boundary

If you are already logged on, crossing an FIR boundary should be automatic, you just need to make sure it all happens. If, for some reason, the next center does not log on correctly, it is up to you to make an initial log on or revert to voice procedures.

Normal Transfer of CPDLC Connection

[ICAO Doc 10037, ¶4.2.3]

  • Under normal circumstances, the current and next ATS units automatically transfer CPDLC and ADS-C services. The transfer is seamless to the flight crew.
  • Note.— The flight crew should not need to reinitiate a logon.

  • The flight crew should promptly respond to CPDLC uplink messages to minimize the risk of an open CPDLC uplink message when transferring to the next ATS unit.
  • Note.— If a flight is transferred to a new ATS unit with an open CPDLC message, the message status will change to ABORTED. If the flight crew has not yet received a response from the controller, the downlink request will also display the ABORTED status.

  • Prior to the point at which the current ATS unit will transfer CPDLC and/or ADS-C services, the flight crew may receive an instruction to close any open CPDLC messages.
  • When entering the next ATS unit’s airspace, the flight crew should confirm the successful transfer from the current ATS unit to the next ATS unit by observing the change in the active ATS unit indication provided by the aircraft system.
  • When required by local procedures, the flight crew should send RTED-5 POSITION REPORT (position report). Alternatively, the flight crew may be required to respond to a CPDLC message exchange initiated by the ATS unit.
  • Note.— Since FANS 1/A aircraft do not report that the downstream ATS unit has become the CDA, the only way to confirm that it has taken place is for the ATS unit to receive a CPDLC message from the aircraft (refer to Appendix B).

G450 Example

Before crossing an FIR boundary, you should get a conditional clearance to contact the next ATSU:

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The clearance is conditional, since it includes a condition when to execute. Accept the clearance, verify message, send. You will see on the LOGON/STATUS page the NEXT CTR field will have the next ATSU listed.

A check in with the older controller is not necessary, but you will have to check in with the new controller once crossing the waypoint indicated in the conditional clearance.

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When the next ATSU takes control, you will see ATC COMM ESTABLISHED and the ATSU going from NEXT CTR to ACT CTR.

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CPDLC Crossing an OCA Boundary

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Figure: Address Forwarding Sequence, from ICAO Gold, figure 2-8.

Crossing an OCA boundary might be as simple as crossing an FIR boundary, but there may be additional steps needed.

Check In Requirements

ICAO Gold, Appendix B, has regional and/or state-specific information that should be consulted prior to transiting these regions. A few extracts from the North Atlantic section, for example:

[ICAO Gold, Appendix B, ¶B.4.3.1.1.3]

  • If the flight enters an oceanic CTA followed by another oceanic CTA, the flight crew should, on initial contact:
    • not include a position report;
    • after the radio operator responds, request a SELCAL check and state the next CTA;
    • The radio operator will assign primary and secondary frequencies, perform the SELCAL check and designate the position and frequencies to contact the aeronautical radio station serving the next oceanic CTA. If the communications instructions are not issued at this stage, the crew should assume that the frequencies to use prior or upon entering the next CTA will be delivered at a later time by CPDLC or voice.
    • Example (Initial contact from an eastbound flight entering GANDER Oceanic)

      GANDER RADIO, AIRLINE 123, SELCAL CHECK, SHANWICK NEXT

      AIRLINE 123, GANDER RADIO, HF PRIMARY 5616 SECONDARY 2899, AT 30 WEST CONTACT SHANWICK RADIO HF PRIMARY 8891 SECONDARY 4675, (SELCAL TRANSMITTED)

      GANDER RADIO, AIRLINE 123, SELCAL OKAY, HF PRIMARY 5616 SECONDARY 2899. AT 30 WEST CONTACT SHANWICK RADIO, HF PRIMARY 8891 SECONDARY 4675

      It has been my experience that most Arinc radio operators accept this method routinely for airline traffic but not so for corporate aviation. For non-airline traffic, I recommend keeping the old practice of adding the term "CPDLC" in this transmission. I've witnessed radio operators getting "testy" with corporate pilots when assuming non-CPDLC operations. So, for example:

      GANDER RADIO, NOVEMBER 7700, CPDLC, SHANWICK NEXT, REQUEST SELCAL CHECK ALPHA BRAVO CHARLIE DELTA

      Note also that current guidance no longer requires you state your flight level for this initial call up.

  • If the flight will exit an oceanic CTA into continental airspace or surveillance airspace, on initial contact with the oceanic CTA, the flight crew should:
    • not include a position report;
    • after the radio operator responds, request a SELCAL check.
    • Example (Initial contact from an eastbound flight about to enter SHANWICK Oceanic)

      SHANWICK RADIO, AIRLINE 123, SELCAL CHECK

      AIRLINE 123, HF PRIMARY 2899 SECONDARY 5616 (SELCAL TRANSMITTED)

      SHANWICK RADIO, AIRLINE 123, SELCAL OKAY, HF PRIMARY 2899 SECONDARY 5616.

      It has been my experience that most Arinc radio operators accept this method routinely for airline traffic but not so for corporate aviation. For non-airline traffic, I recommend keeping the old practice of adding the term "CPDLC" in this transmission. I've witnessed radio operators getting "testy" with corporate pilots when assuming non-CPDLC operations. So, for example:

      GANDER RADIO, NOVEMBER 7700, CPDLC, REQUEST SELCAL CHECK ALPHA BRAVO CHARLIE DELTA

      Note also that current guidance no longer requires you state your flight level and the two points following oceanic exit for this initial call up.

  • Depending on which data link services are offered in the oceanic CTA and the operational status of those services, the aeronautical radio operator will provide appropriate information and instructions to the flight crew (see paragraph B.4.2.1.1 for information regarding associated aeronautical radio operator procedures).
  • If a data link connection cannot be established, maintain normal voice communication procedures. In the event of data link connection failure in a NAT CTA after a successful logon revert to voice and notify the appropriate radio station. Inform AOC in accordance with established problem reporting procedures.
  • For ADS-C flights, the flight crew should not submit position reports via voice to reduce frequency congestion, unless requested by aeronautical radio operator.
  • ADS-C flights are exempt from all routine voice meteorological reporting, however the flight crew should use voice to report unusual meteorological conditions such as severe turbulence to the aeronautical radio station.
  • For any enquiries regarding the status of ADS-C connections, flight crew should use CPDLC. Should the ATS unit fail to receive an expected position report, the controller will follow guidelines in paragraph 3.5.1.7 for late or missing ADS-C reports.
  • When leaving CPDLC/ADS-C or ADS-C-only airspace, the flight crew should comply with all communication requirements applicable to the airspace being entered.
  • If the flight crew does not receive its domestic frequency assignment by 10 minutes prior to the flight’s entry into the next oceanic CTA, the flight crew should contact the aeronautical radio station and request the frequency, stating the current CTA exit fix or coordinates.

You should also check the Jeppesen Airway Manual State Rules and Procedures pages for CPDLC particulars for each region you will transit. For example, when flying the North Pacific Routes:

[Jeppesen Airway Manual, State Rules and Procedures, North Pacific (NOPAC), 7 Jan 2011] Aircraft with an active ADS connection should make one CPDLC position report over the FIR boundary and discontinue CPDLC waypoint reporting after the FIR report.

G450 Example

The first sign of crossing an OCA boundary, such as from Shanwick to Gander, will be the arrival of new ADS contracts to add to the current center's list.

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The new contracts push to the front and you can see the new center's address and it is now asking only for two contracts: the basic contract and one for meteorological data.  When the new center takes over, you will get the laundry list of event contracts added:

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And finally:

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Your HF call will be something like:

"Gander Radio, November seven seven zero zero, CPDLC, CARPE, REDBY, flight level four one zero, request SELCAL check alpha, bravo, charlie, delta."

Note: if you will be leaving oceanic airspace after this OCA, include the last two fixes on the cleared route.

Exit CPDLC and ADS-C Airspace

[ICAO Doc 10037, ¶4.2.5]

  • Approximately 15 minutes after exiting CPDLC and/or ADS-C areas, the flight crew should ensure there are no active CPDLC or ADS-C connections. Ensuring that connections are not active eliminates the possibility of inadvertent or inappropriate use of the connections.
  • The flight crew should consult the current ATS unit prior to the manual termination of any ADS contract, even if it is suspected to be unnecessary or that its termination has failed.
  • In the event that the connection termination has failed, the flight crew should contact the ATS unit via voice or any other appropriate means.
  • Note.— ADS contracts are normally managed (e.g. established and terminated) by ATS units.

When exiting CPDLC and ADS-C airspace, ensure there is no active CPDLC connection by checking that the ACTIVE CENTER on the LOGON page is blank and that there is no active ADS-C connection.

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Photo: MCDU ATC Logon Page (No active centers), from Eddie's aircraft.


See Also:

ICAO Document 10037 - Global Operational Data Link (GOLD) Manual, First Edition, 2017